PEOPLE

PEOPLE

November 13 1989
PEOPLE

PEOPLE

November 13 1989

PEOPLE

A MOTHER’S LOVING GUIDANCE

American actress/director Lee Grant says that it was "impossible" to keep relations strictly professional with one of the leading ladies in her new movie. Grant,58, cast her 30-year-old daughter, Dinah Manoff, as a sexy waitress in her comedy drama Staying Together, to be released this week. Grant said that she worried about one scene in which Manoff wore only scanty lingerie and briefly considered telling her daughter to cover herself up. But in the end, maternal pride triumphed over modesty. Said Grant: "Dinah just looked so yummy."

Changing pace

Although he has no experience as a theatrical actor, Sting is still attracting crowds to see him strut onstage. This week, the British heartthrob of rock ’n’ roll, born Gordon Matthew Sumner, is making his Broadway debut in Bertolt Brecht’s musical/drama The Three Penny Opera as the rogue Macheath. Since his pop group The Police disbanded in 1984, a solo Sting has released two albums with sales of four million.

He has also appeared in 12 movies, but he is new to theatre. Still, his fans have faith—advance sales for his show have topped $5.4 million and the 1,500-seat theatre is sold out until 1990. Sting, 38, who this year took six months away from his

career to study ways to preserve the Amazonian rain forests, said that he took the stage role to challenge himself. He added that, while he will stay with the show’s indefinite run for up to nine months, he plans eventually to return to music. Said Sting: “I can’t not be a musician. Music is going through my head all the time.”

JOB SATISFACTION

For Mila Mulroney, volunteering is a noble activity that is “totally underestimated in Canada.” The Prime Minister’s wife adds that she is frustrated by the way many Canadians downplay the importance of helping out. “When you ask a woman what she does and she replies, ‘Nothing much, I just volunteer,” said Mulroney, “well, try to imagine a hospital or a political organization without volunteers.” To do her part, Mulroney, 36, honorary chairman of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation since 1985, is organizing and hosting a variety show to raise awareness about the hereditary disease, to be broadcast nationally on Dec. 17 on CTV. She has convinced stars such as Christopher Plummer, as well as Wayne Gretzky and U.S. First Lady Barbara Bush, to appear on 65 Roses: A Gift of Love, which takes its title from a child’s mispronunciation of the disease. Said Mulroney: “Volunteering makes you end up really appreciating the things you have. You start each day with a lot more gusto.”

THE REAL McCOY

Before Madonna, there was Deborah Harry. From 1976 until 1982, Harry headed the pop group Blondie and became a worldwide sensation with her platinum-blond hair and raunchy sex-siren image. After Blondie disbanded, Madonna became the new platinum-blond bombshell. Now, Harry, 43, says that she returned to her Blondie persona on her newly released solo album, Dei, Dumb and Blonde. Said Harry: "Blondie was oddly naïve; Debbie Harry has grown up—there's some of both of us on this album." Madonna may face serious competition from the original blondie.

Goodgrief,

Charlie Schulz

His earnings for 1988 and 1989 are estimated at $69 million, but that does not make cartoonist Charles Schulz, 66, happy. The creator of the world's favorite loser, Charlie Brown, is more comfortable with misery than good fortune, according to author Rheta Grimsley Johnson, who recently released Good Grief—The Story of Charles M. Schulz. She writes that Schulz still believes that he is “the awkward kid with a bad complexion. "