PEOPLE

PEOPLE

February 13 1989
PEOPLE

PEOPLE

February 13 1989

PEOPLE

Flying on her own

When Diana, Princess of Wales, visited New York City last week, she arrived in her new role as a single-star attraction. After her Concorde landed, a police convoy, including a 14foot van for her wardrobe during the 43-hour visit, escorted Diana, 27, to her $2,500-a-night suite at a Manhattan hotel. But missing from her entou-

rage was her husband, Prince Charles. Anthony Holden, author of several biographies on Charles, 40, said that “there is a big gulf between the royal couple” and that they lead separate lives. Still, even on her own, Diana ensured that a $l,200-a-plate gala for the Welsh National Opera was well attended by New York’s elite, including the city’s own version of royalty—multimillionaire developer Donald Trump and his wife, Ivana.

Dancing back to another time

Her fans had been waiting a long time for Natalia Makarova to come home. And when she returned to Leningrad last week, 18 years after she defected to London, the 48year-old ballerina made history as she stepped on the stage

with the Kirov Ballet, the company that made Makarova an international star. Her reunion marked the first time that a Soviet dancer who defected has been invited back to perform. When Makarova appeared, the audience greeted her with 20 minutes of enthusiastic applause, which

Makarova: history

drowned out the few cries of “traitor” that punctured the welcoming. For her part, Makarova—who now divides her time between London and San Francisco—said that the homecoming was better than she had dreamed possible. She added, “I was always afraid that, by the time I returned, I would be too old to dance at all.”

Stories on record

Pop star Chris De Burgh has built his success on telling musical tales, but he says that his greatest inspiration comes from another storyteller and fellow Dubliner, the late James Joyce. The singer added that he included a tribute to his literary hero on his latest album, Flying Colours, to thank him for being his muse. Said De Burgh, 38, who begins a 10-city crossCanada tour in Halifax on Feb. 21: “As an artist, I owe him a lot.”

De Burgh: tribute to a literary hero

BASKING IN LOVE’S GLOW

At 61, Canadian actress Frances Hyland says that she has found a new love to help her forget her anger and despair. After spending the past month in London, Ont., acting out the torment of axe-murderer Lizzie Borden in Blood Relations, Hyland said that she was possessed by the anguish of the character. She added that she is "mad" for her new role as Daisy, the quirky matron she will play in the comedy-drama Driving Miss Daisy, which opens in Toronto on Feb. 28. Said Hyland: "Lizzy was so dark, but Daisy is full of light; I love her."

Model of fun

It seemed unlikely to Australian movie director Bruce Beresford that Paulina Porizkova,

one of the most acclaimed fashion models in the world, would prove to be an undiscovered comic. Beresford says that he chose her for his newly released comedy, Her Alibi, because the Czechoslovakian native had the right look and accent for the part of a foreign beauty. Still, he said he worried that the lighthearted role might be difficult for Porizkova, 23. His fears were unfounded. Said Beresford: “With Paulina’s great beauty, you expect her to be affected, but she is full of fun.”