PEOPLE

PEOPLE

February 20 1989
PEOPLE

PEOPLE

February 20 1989

PEOPLE

SEEKING THE SPOTLIGHT

Actress Isabella Rossellini says that she has yet to establish herself as an actress despite flirting with fame for most of her life. As Ingrid Bergman's daughter, Rossellini, 36, grew up in the aura of her actressmother's stardom. At 28, she became a world-famous model, but the New York City resident says that in 13 years she has had only one successful movie role—a masochistic singer in the 1986 thriller Blue Velvet. But she adds that she hopes her part in the newly “j released comedy Cousins will make her in demand. | Said Rossellini: "The jobs now come very slowly."

Smart move

If the mother of one of the world’s top-selling pop stars could have had her way, Paul Simon, 47, would now be a lawyer. In a recently released biography on the six-time Grammy winner, Paul Simon, author Patrick Humphries writes that Simon’s mother urged her son to study law. “Music’s all very well Paul, but you can’t make a living out of it,” she warned him. But after “six miserable months” at Brooklyn Law School, he left to pursue a musical career. The result: 19 hit albums and a multimillion-dollar annual income, showing that mother does not always know best.

SCANDAL IN THE AIR

Washington, D.C., author Kitty Kelley, known for her titillating books on celebrities, is now looking for telling anecdotes about Nancy Reagan. Kelley, whose unauthorized biographies of Elizabeth Taylor, Frank Sinatra and Jackie Kennedy Onassis became best-sellers, has received a $4.8-million advance to write about Ronald Reagan's wife, according to the Washingtonian, an authoritative monthly magazine. The publication adds that Kelley is hinting that one of her sources is Nancy Reagan's estranged daughter, Patti Davis, 36. For her part, Kelley is declining comment, but her answering machine has a recording of Sinatra's 1945 hit, Nancy (With the Laughing Face). For now, it seems it is Kelley who is laughing—all the way to the bank.

REVIVING AN APE’S LOVING MEMORY

Actress Fay Wray, 81, says that she adored the gigantic gorilla, King Kong, who terrified her onscreen 56 years ago. The Mountain View, Alta., native is showing her continuing affection for the famous special-effects beast by planning a party to celebrate the release of her autobiography, On the Other Hand, on the roof of New York City's Empire State Building on Feb. 22. It was there that her relationship with the gorilla ended when he was shot in the 1933 movie. Said Wray: "I think of him as a lasting friend."

Musical obsessions

Renowned guitarist Liona Boyd says that she becomes a “snarling grouch” if she goes without playing her music for too long. “I’m addicted to the guitar,” says the 38-yearold world-famous musician, adding that she suffers withdrawal symptoms if she abandons the instrument for more than two days in a row. But Boyd, who has just released her 15th album—Encore!, featuring many of her own compositions— says that she has plenty of playing time to look forward to as she prepares for a 60-day North American tour, beginning in Petrolia, Ont., on March 9. The Toronto resident claims that music became an obsession after she started taking guitar lessons at 14. Still, Boyd adds that while she no longer follows a strict regimen, she plays and composes at least an hour a day, sometimes starting at 6:30 a.m. and at other times in the middle of the night. Said Boyd: “It doesn’t matter what time of day or night it is—as soon as I pick up the guitar, I feel just wonderful.”