PEOPLE

PEOPLE

February 6 1989
PEOPLE

PEOPLE

February 6 1989

PEOPLE

TIPTOEING AROUND THE WORLD

Whether she is visiting an Indian tribe in the Amazon River valley or a family in the Chicago ghetto, Quebec writer Hélène Tremblay says that she wants to be part of the family. Tremblay, 38, has been travelling since 1982, staying briefly with families around the world to chronicle 24 hours in their lives for a series of books. After visiting 46 families for the newly released Families of the World: The Americas and the Caribbean, Tremblay said that she has learned to be inconspicuous. She added, "When people begin making a fuss over me, I take a nap."

PROFESSIONAL CRIER

Sobs and tears produce happy results on the movie screen for former model Cyndy Preston. The Scarborough, Ont., native, who now plays a teary-eyed sister to a psychopath in the newly released thriller Pin, says that she won her first audition—as the daughter of a terminally ill woman—after weeping over the script. "I cried, and they gave me the part, so acting ¡ust sort of fell into my lap," adds Preston, 22. Her onscreen experience with tragedy later led to her starring role as a traumatized woman in the 1988 horror movie Brain. For Preston, tears are clearly enough.

Mind games

After 42 years as an actor,

Christopher Plummer has

a voice for just about every type of character, but evil ones are his specialty. In his latest movie, the thriller Mindfield scheduled for release in the fall, Plummer puts on an Eastern European accent as he stars as a doctor who conducts illegal experiments on unsuspecting patients. Screenwriter William Deverell, 51, a Vancouver lawyer and author who is turning the screenplay into a book, says that the movie is a fictionalized account of the controversial CIAfunded brainwashing experiments that took place at Montreal’s Allan Memorial Institute in the 1950s and early 1960s. After visiting the

set in Montreal, Deverell praised Plummer’s “convincing” performance as a cruel medical genius. For his part, the 59-year-old, Toronto-born Plummer says that “the nasty doctor is probably Hungarian or Romanian, so I just reached into my bag for accent No. 21.”

ON TOP OF THE NEWS

Armed with nerves of steel and extra-strength hair spray, the onetime grand dame of the White House’s TV press corps, Lesley Stahl, is back on the presidential beat. The CBS TV network journalist, who covered Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan in the White House from 1978 to 1986 before moving to the national-affairs beat, said that she had to be persuaded to return to what is considered one of the top jobs in American broadcasting. For one thing, Stahl, 47, says that she does not relish working in the hot, cramped cubicles down the hall from the offices of President George Bush. For another, she says that keeping up with Bush will be particularly difficult given his history of spontaneous excursions. Still, she adds that she is eager to rejoin the fray and has purchased industrial-hold hair spray to look fresh for her on-camera appearances after a day, or night, spent in what reporters call “the golden cage.” Said Stahl: “We’re all envisioning 24-hour stakeouts at the White House.”

Carving an icy path in history

He has a tiny parish on Baffin Island, but Rev. Guy MaryRousselière’s reputation has spread far beyond the icy tundra. Last week, Father Mary, 75, became the first northerner to win Ottawa’s $5,000 Northern Science Award for his archeological findings— evidence of 4,000-year-old human fossils. Said the priest: “Most researchers from the south are like our birds—they arrive in the spring and leave in the fall. ”