PEOPLE

PEOPLE

September 25 1989
PEOPLE

PEOPLE

September 25 1989

PEOPLE

Reliving old friendships

Last week, former prime minister Pierre Trudeau went to Toronto for a party and for a date with Margot Kidder, now a student at the Canadian Centre for Advanced Film Studies. Trudeau, 69, escorted Kidder—whom he has dated over the years— to a cocktail party at a trendy Italian restaurant to celebrate the opening of the Toronto branch of his Montreal law firm, Heenan Blaikie. Later, Trudeau and Kidder, 40, who once described their relationship as "very special," dined alone at a French restaurant. It seemed the right time for stardust memories.

Surprise fame

Four years ago, says Margo Timmins, she was a disgruntled Ryerson social work student who only sang in the shower. Just one year ago, Timmins, 28, and her country-blues group, Cowboy Junkies, released their first album, The Trinity Session, recorded in a church for $250. Now, the album and the Toronto native are internationally acclaimed, and this week the group is on a five-concert tour in Japan. “My life has completely changed,” said Timmins. “At first, I was scared by the attention, but I’ve since become more secure—some would even say cocky.”

A LONG ROAD TO FREEDOM

Seven years after the prison doors slammed shut on Nova Scotian Bruce Curtis ’s dreams of becoming an astrophysicist, the 25-yearold is free again to work toward his goal. Curtis’s imprisonment became a national issue after he received the maximum 20-year sentence for the 1982 shooting of a friend’s mother in Loch Arbour, N.J. This week, Curtis—who insists that the shooting was accidental—is moving to a Kingston, Ont., halfway house under a parole arrangement from the Springhill, N.S., prison, to study science at nearby Queen’s University. His mother, Alice Curtis, said that her son recently visited his Mount Hanley, N.S., home for the first time since 1982. She added, “He just walked and walked—he had been dreaming of that. ”

ALL THE WORLD’S A STAGE

When Irish rock star Bob Geldof is troubled by an issue, he wants the world to listen. 'T get a bee in my bonnet that I must get out, " said the 34-year-old organizer of Live Aid, the 1985 rock concert that raised $160 million for the hungry in Africa. Geldof's latest obsession: protecting the environment. The singer said that he now is helping a new British TV documentary series about ecological problems to be transmitted globally in 1992. Said Geldof: "You only have power when millions hear and agree with you."

Slighted star

She gets little respect in Hollywood but American actress Blair Brown is a much-loved star in Britain—especially by her British boyfriend, playwright/director David Hare. According to Hare, Brown, 40, who has had few major roles in American movies since making her debut in the 1980 cult hit Altered States, is the most “underappreciated actress” in the United States. For his part, Hare, the author of Plenty and Wetherby, wrote both a movie and a play for Brown. In the drama The Secret Rapture, opening on Broadway next month, she stars as an ineffectual British businesswoman. And in Hare’s new movie, Strapless, which premiered last week at Toronto’s Festival of Festivals, Brown plays an English doctor. Said Hare: “The American movie industry is a mystery to me.”