PEOPLE

PEOPLE

December 10 1990
PEOPLE

PEOPLE

December 10 1990

PEOPLE

A WRITER BEFORE HER TIME

Jean Auel, who writes fiction set in prehistoric times, says that she not only is popular with millions of casual readers, but gets "a good deal of respect from the academic community." The reason, says Auel, is that "I'm a novelist who does her homework

well." Auel, who has recently published her best-selling The Plains of Passage, the fourth novel in her six-part Earth's Children series, said, "Scientists see me as explaining their points of view." Added Auel, 54: "I offer an alternative to the Hollywood stereotype of the guy with the leopard skin dragging a woman by her hair."

Reign in Spain

Women around the world have amply demonstrated their love for Spanish singer Julio Iglesias. His 79 albums, in six languages, have sold 200-million copies. Still, he says that he is not satisfied. The reason: his Englishlanguage records have not been huge successes. But Iglesias says that all that will change now that his latest album, Starry Night, is out. Added the tenor, 47: “I’m working for 35 years and this is the first time they take me seriously.” He added: “Before, all they ask me about is the number of girlfriends I have, or my sex life. But now people feel I sound natural in English.”

Justifying the fantasies

Once again, the material girl is manipulating the media. The release last week of Madonna’s latest video, Justify My Love, unleashed a barrage of shocked reprobation—and publicity. The video features bisexuality, men dressed as women, group sex and suggestions of sadomasochism. Canada’s music video network, MuchMusic, and MTV, its American counterpart, said that they would not broadcast the video. Said Madonna: “Not everyone is comfortable with this, but these fantasies exist in all human beings. I want people to deal with them.”

SUCCESS ABROAD

Rita MacNeil, the shy, soft-spoken singer from Cape Breton, N.S., has, until now, been largely unknown outside her native land. But last week, MacNeil returned from an Australian tour, and will soon go to Britain. While she was Down Under, MacNeil's song Working Man, from her 1988 hit album, Reason To Believe, topped local music charts. Said MacNeil, 45: “It 's not the kind of song you'd think would go to number 1. But it grabbed the attention of a lot of listeners." In Canada, MacNeil has just released her latest album, Home I’ll Be, and CTV plans to broadcast her Christmas special on Dec. 17. About her overseas successes, she added, I'm still a little leery about being far from home, but wonderful people come to the shows. "

An artistic light for native rights

Mohawk artist Joe David spent last summer patrolling the woods near Oka, Que., with other Mohawk Warriors who were manning the barricades against a planned golf course expansion. The Warriors surrendered to the army

on Sept. 26, but David said that he plans to continue expressing native concerns through his art. As part of a recent native arts exhibition in L’Annonciation, Que., 145 km northwest of Montreal, David assembled a sculpture commemorating the siege, his first work since being re-

leased in October from police custody. David incorporated tokens from the conflict into his sculpture, including razor wire and poles left behind by surveyors. Said David, 33, who pleaded not guilty to weapons charges: “The courts are trying to make us feel like terrorists. This is something to make us feel better about what we did.”