PEOPLE

PEOPLE

December 17 1990
PEOPLE

PEOPLE

December 17 1990

PEOPLE

JINGLING PHONE BELLS

Czechoslovakian-born actor Jan Rubes, who had a supporting role in the 1985 movie Witness, says that he is pleased by all his recent honors. Last week, Rubés, 70, won a lifetime-achievement Gemini award. He also plays the grandfather on the new and

critically acclaimed CBC television series Max Glide. But all that pales beside his immediate challenge. Rubes will be Santa Claus again this year on a YTV phone-in show running from Dec. 17 to 21. Last year, 500,000 children tried to call the show. But said the veteran actor: "My philosophy is to keep my profile as low as possible. I'm just Santa."

Rubês: low-profile Santa Claus

Canadian material girl

Pop singer Candi, described by some music critics as Canada’s Madonna, acknowledges that she owes a lot to her American idol. “She has been a major influence on me with both her dance-oriented style and with image,” said Candi, 23, bom Candita Pennella in Toronto. Now, as she and her band, the Backbeat, pursue success with their second album, World Keeps On Turning, Candi has revealed another musical hero. Said the singer: “I’m also really inspired by Mozart. I want to be able to do what he does in a four-minute song.”

Devil’s delight

Time and two sequels have passed since special-effects artists made 13-year-old Linda Blair’s head spin in the chilling 1973 movie The Exorcist. But Blair, 31, has not had many roles as an adult. Now, she is back on screen in Repossessed, an Exorcist spoof that also stars Canadianborn Leslie Nielsen. This time, her character’s name is not Regan, but Nancy. Said Blair: “You’re supposed to think of Nancy Reagan.” She added: “It's the same thing as The Exorcist, real slapstick. My head turns around again, I throw up on my family, my bed shakes. It’s a cute film.”

A MID-LIFE MARVEL

Gary Cowan, an insurance agent from Kitchener, Ont, says that he has a unique dilemma: at 52, in the same job after 28 years, he has to decide whether to become a professional golfer. At a December tournament in Rancho Mirage, Calif., Cowan, the only amateur, became one of eight golfers—out of a field of 500—who qualified to get their Senior PGA 1991 tour card. Said Cowan: “I don’t know how much money I would make on tour. I know how much I’ll make selling insurance. ” Although he is hesitant, Cowan’s four children are all encouraging him to tour—even his eldest son, who may be in for a surprise. Added Cowan: “My son Rob shares my office. There’s certainly a potential that he may have some extra unexpected work.’’

From bad to sinister

Although he received a Gemini award last week for his gripping performance as convicted murderer and former Saskatchewan MLA Colin Thatcher, Canadian actor Kenneth Welsh says that he “would like to leave Colin be-

hind.” Indeed, Welsh went from that role in the highly rated 1989 CBC mini-series Love and Hate to a new and improved bad guy. Late last month, Welsh, 48, joined the cast of the critically acclaimed ABC series Twin Peaks as Windom Earle, the currently missing ex-partner

of FBI special agent Dale Cooper. Although Welsh says that he “would get into serious trouble” if he divulged future plots of the cliff-hanging series, he does say that Earle is “intellectually sinister, a master of manipulation, more sophisticated than Thatcher.” Added Welsh: “I had always hoped to play a character like this.”