COVER

THE MACLEAN'S HONOR ROLL

December 31 1990
COVER

THE MACLEAN'S HONOR ROLL

December 31 1990

THE MACLEAN'S HONOR ROLL

COVER

In his new book, Words with Power, scholar Northrop Frye, whose powerful contributions to the world of ideas are celebrated in the fifth annual Maclean’s Honor Roll, defines primary human concerns as “freedom, health, equality, happiness, love.” Those concerns have been represented, in their various creative ways, by the 62 Canadians whose accomplishments have been honored by Maclean’s from 1986 through 1990 and who are present-

ed in the accompanying anniversary roster. They have helped in many different fields of endeavor—from the arts and the sciences to philanthropy and business—to make an enriching difference in the life of Canada.

As with many of those in previous years, the achievements of all 12 Canadians on the 1990 Maclean’s Honor Roll, including the teaching and scholarship of Northrop Frye, are international in scale. And the year’s accomplishments of Frye and some others reflect decades of inspired creativity. The career of Jean Coulthard, the Vancouver composer whose music is performed and appreciated across Canada and abroad, had its beginnings in childhood more than 70 years ago. The popular songs of Margo Timmins became known to an international public less than half that many months ago. Writer Mordecai Richler has a worldwide readership. From their roots in Canada, the creative enterprise of Alberta’s Ronald Southern, Quebec’s Jeannine Guillevin Wood and New Brunswick’s Harrison McCain has expanded across borders and oceans. That is also the case with the imaginative talent and teaching of actress Rosemary Dunsmore and with the inspired and inspiring leadership skills of aviator Daniel Dempsey.

Others were living overseas when they first encountered the inspiration that launched them on their present work. Biologist Tissa Senaratna, who gave his discoveries to the world during 1990, brought his dedication to the genetic improvement of agriculture to Canada from his native Sri Lanka. Lawyer Rosalie Abella, who has influenced reforms in the law abroad as well as at home, absorbed her commitment to social justice in Germany as the child of survivors of the Holocaust. And it was in a small vil-

lage in northeast-

ern France that Jean Vanier began to realize his idea of bringing mentally handicapped people into communities built on affection

and encouragement, an idea that now spans Canada and girdles the globe.

There are many others whose contributions to Canada and the world warrant inclusion on a roster of honor. Those selected by a panel of Maclean ’s editors must be Canadian citizens who are not professionally engaged in politics. The total each year has been 12,

except in 1988, when the trio of enter-

except tainers Sharon, Lois & Bram were honored as one.

Among the many members of the Maclean ’s staff who helped to compile and present this year’s report are those who wrote the profiles of the people on the 1990 Honor Roll on the following pages, in order: Carl Mollins, Diane Brady, John Howse, Barry Came, Brian D. Johnson,

Came, Victor Dwyer, Glen Allen, Howse, D’Arcy Jenish, Hal Quinn and Andrew Phillips. Chief Staff Photographer Brian Wilier again composed the Honor Roll portraits, assisted by Philippe Caron of Paris, who photographed Jean Vanier with some of his fellow residents of the original L’Arche community in France.

Toronto artist Dora de Pédery-Hunt designed the bronze medallion that goes to each of the individuals honored. As she said in when

she decided that her design should feature Pegasus, the winged horse known in classical mythology as a force that freed the human imagination and encouraged creative achievement, “The medallion’s portrayal of Pegasus rising towards the stars is fitting for the people that Maclean ’s is honoring, because all of them—whatever their fields of accomplishment— are reaching for excellence.”