PEOPLE

PEOPLE

July 30 1990
PEOPLE

PEOPLE

July 30 1990

PEOPLE

A coy new couple

She rose to stardom after charming audiences as a young bride in Steel Magnolias and as a hooker-with-a-heart-of-gold in Pretty Woman. Julia Roberts is Hollywood’s new favorite. She is also the favorite of Canadian actor Kiefer Sutherland, her co-star in Flatliners, to be released next month, about medical students experiment-

ing with dying and returning to life. Sutherland gave Roberts a diamond ring while they were dining at a drive-in burger restaurant in Los Angeles recently. Said the son of Donald Sutherland: “I’d been holding on to it waiting for the right place.” But neither Sutherland, 23, who has a daughter from his first marriage, nor Roberts, 22, who has never married, will say that they are engaged. Declared Sutherland: “I just gave it to her.”

Mother of the century

As matriarch of the Kennedy dynasty, Rose Kennedy has experienced glory and tragedy. On July 22, the mother of nine, including assassinated sons John and Robert, turned 100. To celebrate, about 350 people, among them 28 grandchildren and 22 great-grandchildren, gathered at her Hyannisport, Mass., home. Said her son Edward: “Rose is the most inspir| ing teacher and wonderful mother that any child > could have. She’s the anchor of our family.”

A POET’S NOVEL IDEA

Poet AI Purdy has published 33 books and won two Governor General's Awards. Now, he plans to publish his first novel, A Splinter in the Heart. It takes place in 1918 in his home town, Trenton, Ont., and deals with a real-life explosion in a munitions factory that killed 22 people. Said Purdy, 71: 'The hero isn't me, but there are incidents from my life." He is now writing a "chunk of autobiography" for Books in Canada. "You can't say anything nasty that will get you sued," Purdy added, "but in the novel I don't make anyone look bad, so I'm OK."

Out of nowhere

Nashville-based country star Clint Black, 28, seems like an overnight success. His debut album, Killin’ Time, has sold 1.6 million copies, and for 14 weeks it has appeared on the list of Top 10 country albums. But the Houston native said that it took him six years of playing in local clubs at night and working on construction during the day to get there. Added Black, who won the 1989 Country Music Association’s award for most promising newcomer: “I was singing four to seven hours a night in the clubs and getting nowhere. I knew I would be hurting my vocal cords if I went on much longer.” Black: construction jobs

The good, the bad and the golf ball

After a lifetime in show business, Mickey Rooney, 69, says that working in Langley, B.C., on the YTV series The Adventures of the Black Stallion “has been the finest experience I’ve had in motion pictures and TV.” Rooney ac-

knowledged that he has been in some bottom-drawer movies, including How to Stuff a Wild Bikini (1965) and The Magic of Lassie (1978). Now, he is in British Columbia for three months replaying his 1979 Oscar-nominated role as the horse trainer in The Black Stallion. Said Rooney:

“I’ve always loved Canada. In 1937, I was golfing in Banff and three bears came out of the woods and grabbed my ball.” However, the actor said that nothing so dramatic has occurred on the Vancou| ver Country Club course. But

0 he added: “It’s lovely being g here. And after being in so

1 many lousy shows, it’s great I to be in a good one.”