CANADA

PERKS OF POWER

Anthony Wilson-Smith March 23 1992
CANADA

PERKS OF POWER

Anthony Wilson-Smith March 23 1992

National Notes

RECOGNIZING RIEL

Nearly 107 years after he was executed for treason after leading an 1885 uprising by Métis in Saskatchewan, the House of Commons acknowledged Louis Riel’s contributions to Confederation. The Commons unanimously passed a resolution acknowledging Riel’s earlier efforts to ensure that Métis and francophone rights were protected in the 1870 legislation creating the province of Manitoba.

NO NUKES—FOR NOW

Pressured by party supporters, Saskatchewan Premier Roy Romanow announced that his NDP government is scrapping an agreement signed last year between the previous Conservative administration and Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. for a $50million research project into the construction of a CANDU 3 nuclear reactor. In its place, the NDP is creating an institute to examine the province’s energy options— including nuclear power—through the year 2020.

IN LIFE, AND IN DEATH

Federal Revenue Minister Otto Jelinek ordered an investigation into a controversial Reform party fund-raising scheme that he said is probably “illegal.” Under the Reform proposal, supporters would sign over their life insurance policies to the party—with the party named as beneficiary. The members could then make contributions to the party to pay for the premiums and receive federal tax credits in return. A party spokesman accused Jelinek of launching a “witch-hunt.”

FIGHTING MAD

In a nationally televised CBC interview, Prime Minister Brian Mulroney expressed outrage over what he called “an incitement to gang-rape my daughter” that appeared last fall in the Ottawa-based gossip magazine Frank. Mulroney said that he lost his temper after reading about Frankls mock contest urging young Tories to prove that they had sex with his 17-year-old daughter, Caroline. Declared Mulroney: “I wanted to take a gun and do serious damage to these people.”

FREEDOM FOR NEPOOSE

Ruling that he was the victim of a miscarriage of justice, the Alberta Court of Appeal ordered a new trial for Wilson Nepoose, a Cree Indian from Alberta convicted of the 1986 murder of a native woman. Nepoose, who was released from prison on bail in November, will remain free while the Crown decides whether to appeal the ruling, order a new trial or drop the case entirely.