PEOPLE

PEOPLE

August 17 1992
PEOPLE

PEOPLE

August 17 1992

PEOPLE

Blond bombshell

She is blond and glamorous, and was once the star of German track and field. As a result, the suspension last February of Katrin Krabbe, for allegedly manipulating urine samples to avoid doping controls, rocked the nation. Germany’s athletics federation later overturned that ban. Last week, another bombshell: German officials report-

ported that new urine samples from the worldchampion sprinter and teammate Grit Breuer bore traces of the banned drug Clenbuterol. Neither Krabbe nor Breuer competed at Barcelona. But both could face four-year suspensions. Teammate Manuela Derr told a German newspaper that all three took Clenbuterol thinking it was an allowed substance. Declared Derr: “We wouldn’t be so stupid and use a banned drug.”

Bilingual dexterity

Tony Nardi is one of the few actors who works regularly in both English Canada and Quebec. That dexterity has taken an odd twist: the French-language movie La Sarrasine, in which he plays a Montreal tailor, will open at the Toronto Festival of Festivals in September-a month after Vita Cane, shot in English in Ontario and also starring Nardi, opens at the Montreal Film Festival. Said Nardi, 34, of his bicultural career: "It's funny. Whenever you're in one, you're considered as being from the other side."

MONEY AND THE FRUGAL BARBER

In 1988, author and former stockbroker David Chilton set out to do the seemingly impossible: write a financial planning book that was both enlightening and entertaining. The result was The Wealthy Barber, which, since 1989, has sold more than 320,000 copies in Canada alone. Now, the Waterloo, Ont., resident will film a two-part finance series for PBS starting in November. But despite his own newfound wealth, Chilton, 30, says that “I haven't had time to spend the money. Besides, I'm not that money-oriented."

World music

Combining traditional and modem musical styles, Loreena McKennitt describes her soulful productions as world music. Added the harpist-singer: “There are many cross-cultural influences, and a range of instruments, from the sitar to the electric guitar.” And the Stratford, Ont., resident’s new album has achieved international popularity, with her promoters marketing The Visit in 30 countries. At the same time, she receives fan mail from around the world. “A lot of the growth came through word of mouth,” she said, “because my music doesn’t fit into a lot of the commercial formats.”

Police radio,

Los Angeles-style

“Good evening, this is Daryl Gates. Maybe some of you will remember me.” With those words, the former chief of the Los Angeles Police Department, who quit in June during a controversy over the acquittal of four white offi-

cers in the beating of black motorist Rodney King, began a three-evening stint as a callin show host on L.A. radio station KFI AM. During his two hours behind the microphone on Aug. 5, Gates criticized the recent indictment of the officers on civil rights charges and fielded only a few calls

from angry citizens. But the fledgling announcer did take on his political adversaries. Referring to city councillor Michael Woo, who has said that he will run for Tom Bradley’s mayoral post, as “probably the weakest leader we have,” Gates added: “But, following in Bradley’s footsteps, maybe some people will want more of the same.”