CANADA

National Notes

September 21 1992
CANADA

National Notes

September 21 1992

National Notes

DISASTER IN THE FIELDS Deputy Prime Minister Donald Mazankowski said that Ottawa is prepared to offer emergency aid to western fanners, many facing financial disaster. An unseasonably cool, rainy summer delayed the growth of many crops, while more rain and, in some areas, frost and snow are now threatening the harvest. According to the Saskatchewan Wheat Pool, only 23 per cent of that province’s wheat crop has so far been harvested, compared with 74 per cent at this time last year.

CALLING IT QUITS

Former Nova Scotia Liberal leader Vincent MacLean announced that he is resigning his Cape Breton South seat. MacLean stepped down from the party leadership in March after facing months of widespread criticism within his party.

EDMONTON HORROR

After a 56-hour search, the body of sixyear-old Corinne Gustavson of Edmonton was discovered in a local industrial lot. Police say that she was abducted from a neighbor’s yard by a dark-haired man. Autopsy results showed that she had been sexually assaulted and smothered.

CLOSING THE PORTS

B.C. commercial fishermen threatened to blockade the province’s ports in their ongoing battle against Indian fishing rights. The fishermen claim that Ottawa's June decision to allow some native bands to harvest salmon before they reach their spawning grounds is endangering the salmon fishery.

NO LEAVE TO APPEAL

The Supreme Court of Canada denied Second World War criminal Jacob Luitjens leave to appeal his denaturalization order. Luitjens, a former botany lecturer at the University of British Columbia, is facing deportation to his native Netherlands, where he was convicted in absentia in 1948 for collaborating with the Nazis. Ottawa stripped Luitjens of his Canadian citizenship last year.

JUDGING THE POLICE

According to a Metropolitan Toronto Police Services Board report, racial bias exists within the Toronto police department—although the report added that there is no evidence of overt racism. But it noted that while recruits may enter the force with no discernible prejudices, over time they tend to “develop strong feelings and beliefs as to attributes of individuals based on factors such as appearance and racial background.”