CANADA

Canada NOTES

October 9 1995
CANADA

Canada NOTES

October 9 1995

Canada NOTES

CANADA

Seaplane tragedy

Eight people died after a single-engine Turbo Otter seaplane crashed while trying to make an emergency landing 15 km west of the northern Vancouver Island community of Campbell River. The plane was returning home with a crew of loggers from a remote work camp on British Columbia’s north coast mainland when it lost radio contact with flight controllers and crashed into a wooded hillside. The plane’s wings, tail and sea floats were sheered off by trees, and the battered fuselage ended up on its side with the victims inside. But in what authorities described as something of a miracle, two of the passengers— Charlotte Pfister and Len Brown, both of Campbell River—survived the crash.

After visiting his ex-wife in the hospital, Bruce Pfister said the plane apparently got lost in the fog shortly before it crashed. “She

said [the pilot] tried to bank the plane upward, but the fog was so heavy he just couldn’t see a thing,” said Pfister. The survivor’s son, Jason Pfister, said his mother may have been saved when she was thrown clear of the wreckage. Rescuers said that they found Pfister wandering through the forest near the crash site in a state of shock.

Native sovereignty

Richard Kahgee, chief of the Saugeen First Nation, declared his band’s sovereignty over the waters of Ontario’s Bruce Peninsula, which separates Lake Huron and Georgian Bay. Kahgee, who said the band’s jurisdiction covers about 300 km of shoreline up to 11 km out into the lake, maintained that the Saugeen never relinquished its rights to the waters. University of Toronto law professor Craig Scott said they “have an incredibly good basis” for asserting their sovereignty.

GRIZZLY ATTACK

A severely underweight grizzly bear and her cub went on an early-morning rampage through a campground at Lake Louise, Alta., ripping open tents and mauling six foreign tourists. “I thought I was going to die,” said Owen Hereford, 22, of Melbourne, Australia, who suffered two severe bites on his left leg and others on his arm and abdomen. Wardens at Banff National Park later trapped and destroyed the grizzly and her cub.

ACQUITTED OF FRAUD

Former Saskatchewan cabinet minister Lome Kopelchuk was acquitted on a charge of fraud under $5,000 for allegedly using his communications allowance as an MLA to buy a portable public address system. Kopelchuk’s lawyer, Orest Rosowsky, had argued that his client—one of 11 former and current Saskatchewan Conservative MLAs charged with misusing public money—was “a dupe” who had no idea that a false invoice would be used to pay for the system. The Crown was considering an appeal.

A CANCER EPIDEMIC?

A study published in the Canadian Journal of Public Health said that cases of prostate cancer among Canadian men are projected to almost triple over the next 20 years. The study states that part of the expected increase is due to an aging population, part is due to improved methods of detecting the disease, and part is a mystery, perhaps related to chemical pollutants in the environment.

HEADING SOUTH

Former Yukon government leader Tony Penikett has been hired as a full-time adviser to the Saskatchewan cabinet, effective Oct. 2. In announcing the appointment to the $78,000-a-year job, Premier Roy Romanow lauded Penikett’s expertise in “areas of political consultation, public affairs and constitutional issues.” Penikett has served as an NDP member of the Yukon legislature since 1978.

MENTALLY COMPETENT

Bruce Clark, the controversial Ottawabased lawyer who represented several natives involved in the recent 31-day armed standoff at Gustafsen Lake, B.C., was released from custody after psychiatrists determined that he does not have a mental disorder. Clark was cited for contempt of court and sent for psychiatric evaluation after he shouted accusations and obscenities at a provincial court judge in 100 Mile House, B.C.