Best-Sellers

Brian Bethune October 25 1999

Best-Sellers

Brian Bethune October 25 1999

Best-Sellers

Fiction

1. PILGRIM, Timothy Findley (9) 1

2. A STAR CALLED HENRY, Roddy Doyle (5) 2

3. PERSONAL INJURIES, Scott Turow (2) 3

4. HEARTS IN ATLANTIS, Stephen King (2) 4

5. IN PURSUIT OF THE PROPER SINNER,

Elizabeth George (5) 5

6. DEATH DU JOUR, Kathy Reichs (20)..........8

7. SUMMER GONE, David Macfarlane (1)

8. THE MUSEUM AT PURGATORY, Nick Bantock (1)

9. THE REMORSEFUL DAY, Colin Dexter (1)

10. HANNIBAL, Thomas Harris (19)................7

Nonfiction

1. 'TIS, Frank McCourt (3) ...................1

2. THE MITROKHIN ARCHIVE,

Christopher Andrew and Vasili Mitrokhin (3).....2

3. JAN WONG’S CHINA, Jan Wong (3) .............9

4. DUTCH, Edmund Morris (2)...................3

5. HITLER'S POPE, John Cornwell (2) .............4

6. STIFFED, Susan Faludi (1)

7. PAPER SHADOWS, Wayson Choy (2)............5

8. WILLIAM OSLER, Michael Bliss (1)

9. BALTIMORE’S MANSION,

Wayne Johnston (4).........................8

10. THE FIRSTW0RLD WAR, John Keegan (7)........6

( ) Weeks on list Compiled by Brian Bethune

Animal behaviour

Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson is probably the world’s most prominent—and controversial—exponent of the theory that animals have emotions as complex and intense as humans. In his new book, The Emperor’s Embrace (Simon & Schuster), the Freudian analyst turned animal behaviourist discusses fatherhood in the natural world. Masson examines the paternal roles of “good” animal fathers, from the emperor penguin—who incubates his mate’s egg throughout the Antarctic winter—to the beaver who carries his offspring about on his tail. Where most scientists see evolutionary adaptation at work, Masson perceives true protectiveness, “a profound, allencompassing experience” akin to what human fathers feel.