Canada

Canada Notes

September 20 1999
Canada

Canada Notes

September 20 1999

Canada Notes

Canada

An end to the search for Michel Trudeau

British Columbia’s Kokanee Lake will likely be the final resting place of Michel Trudeau after the RCMP called off an underwater search for his body. The 23-year-old son of former prime minister Pierre Trudeau and Margaret Kemper died last November after being swept into the 100-m-deep lake by an avalanche. Authorities said his body probably rests in an unaccessible area.

‘I believe him to be a man of his word’

German-Canadian businessman Karlheinz Schreiber left jail after a bipartisan effort to help raise his $1.2million bail. Stepping forward to support the lobbyist were Elmer Mackay, a former Conservative cabinet minister, and Marc Lalonde, a Liberal minister under Pierre Trudeau. Both men pledged $100,000 towards bail for Schreiber, who was arrested on Aug. 31 at the request of German authorities investigating him for allegedly failing to pay $21 million in taxes on $38 million in undeclared income.

Lalonde represented Schreiber as a lawyer when the businessman was trying to set up an armoured-vehicle plant in Nova Scotia in the 1980s. Mackay, as a Nova Scotia cabinet minister, backed the project. At Schreibers bail hearing, Ontario Superior Court Judge David Humphrey was hesitant to release him; at the time of his arrest, Schreiber had been well-prepared for flight, with an emergency kit that included blankets, a compass, a Swiss army knife, German and Canadian passports, and more than $30,000 in nine currencies. But Mackay said he had no doubt Schreiber would appear at his extradition hearing, adding: “I believe him to be a man of his word.”

The human influx continues

Canadian authorities on the West Coast intercepted a ship filled with more than 150 illegal immigrants from China—the fourth such incident since midJuly (an immigration official said two other ships likely made it to British Columbia in early July without being detected). Last week, Foreign Affairs Minister Lloyd Axworthy said the Chinese government is co-operating with Canada in an effort to stop the illegal smuggling. Ottawa also said it would investigate complaints that earlier arrivals were mistreated by RCMP officers at a detention camp.

Gardens for sale

Toronto’s venerable Maple Leaf Gardens will be put up for sale. In making the announcement, Maple Leafs president Ken Dryden said the historic site has lost more than $1 million since the Leafs moved to their new arena, the Air Canada Centre, in February.

Ruling against discrimination

The Supreme Court of Canada ruled that an aerobics test that kept Tawney Meiorin of British Columbia from continuing to work as a forest firefighter was discriminatory. In its unanimous judgment, the Supreme Court said the stringent test, which Meiorin failed after more than two years on the job, did not take into account the physiological differences between men and women.

A licence revoked

The Canadian Coast Guard revoked the exploration licence of the Alcyone, the research vessel of the late French undersea expert Jacques Cousteau (it replaced the renowned Calypso). The move came after complaints that the crew, which was filming a documentary on whales in the St. Lawrence River, harassed and even injured the animals.

Regan redux

Former Nova Scotia premier Gerald Regan, 70, who was acquitted last year of several sex-related charges, could be headed back to court. Last week, the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal overturned a stay of proceedings on nine indecent assault charges. Regan’s lawyer, Edward Greenspan, said that he will appeal the decision to the Supreme Court of Canada if the Crown decides to proceed.

Closing the books

Military investigators said they were ending their investigation into the case of Ann Margaret Dickey. The 26year-old woman says that in 1996, as a Canadian Forces recruit, she was the victim of a series of sexual assaults at boot camp near Montreal. But military spokesmen said they found no evidence to support Dickey’s allegations.