People

People

Anthony Wilson-Smith July 17 2000
People

People

Anthony Wilson-Smith July 17 2000

People

Anthony Wilson-Smith

Shanda Deziel

More than a basic boy band

These days, good-looking guys singing pop music are bound to be given the “boy-band” label— but the three members of soulDecision will fight for their honour. “If you educate people and show them that you write tracks and produce tracks,” Ken Lewko begins, before Dave Bowman finishes his sentence, “at the end of the day, they don’t say, ‘Trev looked really cute playing his guitar.’ ” Bowman is speaking of Trevor Guthrie, the band’s front man. And make no mistake, that’s exactly what most fans are going to say about the tall blond drink of water.

The three Vancouverites met in a music program at Capilano College. They’ve been writing and playing together since 1991, but couldn’t get anywhere in Vancouver with their R and B pop style. Last year, they moved to Toronto and released No One Does It Better, which spawned the hit single Faded. While pushing for respectability, they’re also riding the wave of bubblegum pop. Last week, they joined Christina Aguilera for a crossCanada tour. Their Web site reads like Teen Beat magazine, complete with each member’s astrological sign, likes and dislikes. But they refrain from giving their ages, because, as Bowman says, “some 16-year-old girl doesn’t want to find out that I’m 28 years old.” Or even older.

Round 2 for Katharine Ross

Katharine Ross won’t dish about her costars of days gone by. The classically beautiful actress, who teamed with Robert Redford and Paul Newman in 1969’s Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and was Dustin Hoffman’s object of affection in 1967’s The Graduate, says, in a bored tone, that those sets were “in general, pretty enjoyable.” Hollywood was never her favourite thing: after making those two films and more than 20 others, she retreated to a ranch near Malibu, Calif., to start a family with her husband, actor Sam Elliott. “After I had my daughter,” says Ross, 58, “I felt it was more important that I embrace motherhood and not pursue a career in the forefront.”

Now that her daughter, Chloe, is a teenager, Ross says she’s ready for a comeback, and will film two movies this sum-

mer. Her road back will be helped by the current re-release of Butch. The DVD and video edition highlight Ross’s quiet, alluring presence and hazel-eyed sex appeal—qualities that live on, 31 years later.

Leila’s life: Dutoit, diapers

For Leila Josefowicz, touring isn’t lonesome.The 22-year-old violinist plays at least twice a month in far-flung locales, but is joined at each stop by her threemonth-old baby, Lukas, her mother, Wendy (who takes care of the baby) and her husband, conductor Kristjan Järvi-who arranges his performing schedule so they aren’t apart. Recently, as Josefowicz practised with the Toronto Symphony Or chestra, grandma sat in the corner tending to a wellbehaved baby. “I tell Leila all the time she’s so lucky,” says Wendy, “ ’cause she was nothing like this.”

Josefowicz was born outside Toronto, but moved to California at age three. That year, her father signed both of them up for violin lessons.

“When I was 5,” says Josefowicz, “I told my dad, ‘Maybe you should stop, you’re not so good,’ and I continued.” She studied at the Curtis Institute in Philadelphia and released her first album at 17. Fier latest album is a recording of violin concertos by Mendelssohn and Glazunov with Charles Dutoit conducting the Montreal Symphony Orchestra. Josefowicz and her husband are major figures in the New York City classical music scene. Järvi, 27, leads Absolute Ensemble, which Josefowicz describes as “a progressive, almost rock-bandish type of classical group.” Järvi’s musical recklessness has begun to rub off on Josefowicz, whose next project is a collection of ragtime tunes. “I used to be such a traditionalist,” she says. “Now I feel like I want to go crazy;’