PASSAGES

PASSAGES

August 14 2000
PASSAGES

PASSAGES

August 14 2000

PASSAGES

Died: Hugh Hood described himself as “through and through a Catholic writer.” The son of an English-speaking father and a French-speaking mother, Hood was born in Toronto and moved to Montreal, where he became an English professor. His first collection of short stories, Flying a Red Kite, published in 1962, is considered a Canadian classic. Hood wrote 31 more works of fiction and nonfiction, and was praised for descriptions of life in Eastern Canada. In 1975, he began a project of 12 novels called the New Age series, a family saga from the 1930s to the 1980s. The 12th volume, New Water, will be published next month. Hood, 72, died in his Montreal home after suffering a stroke.

Died: Former Ontario attorney general and deputy premier Robert Welch was the junior mayor of St. Catharines, Ont., when he was 16 years old. Later, as a Conservative, he won six consecutive elections and held 12 cabinet portfolios under three premiers—John Robarts, Bill Davis, and Frank Miller. After he retired, Welch was appointed by Prime Minister Brian Mulroney to the International Joint Commission overseeing water quality in the Great Lakes. He died in St. Catharines of prostate cancer, at age 72.

Charged: Mafiaboy, the 16-yearold Montrealer accused of crippling CNN’s Web site last February, pleaded not guilty to 64 new charges of computer hacking and mischief. Prosecutors believe they have linked the youth to attacks on Yahoo!, Amazon.com, Dell, eBay and U.S. university sites like Harvard and Berkeley. He has been out on bail since April. If convicted, he faces two years in youth detention.

Announced: Starting Sept. 1, Macleans columnist Allan Fotheringham, 67, will also be filing columns twice weekly to The Globe and Mail. The newspaper lured him away from The Toronto Sun, the tabloid for which he has written for the past 12 years, by making him “an offer I couldn’t refuse, ” Fotheringham said. His inaugural columns will be set in Australia, where he will be attending the Olympics. Says Fotheringham: “I’ll be doing sports, politics and causing trouble with the Commonwealth.”

Released: American actor Robert Downeyjr., 35, is a free man. Downey has been serving a three-year sentence in a California state prison after missing scheduled drug tests while on probation for cocaine possession. Due to an error on the part of Downey’s sentencing judge, the California state appellate court released him three months early. After leaving prison, the Oscar-nominated actor checked into a rehab centre.

Died: Legendary New Yorker editor William Maxwell wrote his first novel, Bright Center of Heaven, in 1934. But he achieved greater success once Katharine White, a founding editor of the New Yorker, made him the magazine’s fiction editor. During his 40 years with the publication, he worked with some of the century’s most celebrated writers, including J. D. Salinger, John Cheever and John Updike. Maxwell, 91, died at his home in Manhattan.

Sentenced: A Calgary judge has ruled Jean-Guy Tremblay, 36, is not a dangerous offender despite his 14 convictions of violence against women over a 10-year period. Justice Scott Brooker noted that dangerousoffender status is intended for the very worst of criminals: Tremblay, he said, was not that. Instead, Tremblay was deemed a long-term offender and was sentenced to a maximum of 10 years of community supervision after he is released from his current 5lh year prison term for assault.