COVER

PRIMARILY UNDERGRADUATE

MOUNT ALLISON UNIVERSITY

JOHN DEMONT November 19 2001
COVER

PRIMARILY UNDERGRADUATE

MOUNT ALLISON UNIVERSITY

JOHN DEMONT November 19 2001

PRIMARILY UNDERGRADUATE

RANKINGS

MOUNT ALLISON UNIVERSITY

JOHN DEMONT

Lungile Tinarwo was looking for something entirely different when she finished high-school in Harare, Zimbabwe. Mount Allison University certainly fit the bill: its tiny campus and surrounding flat marshlands were strange enough. But the young woman from sweltering big-city Africa arrived in January last year. “The snow was terrifying,” she recalls. Then there was the culture shock: how many of her former schoolmates, after all, could boast of becoming cardcarrying members of the campus Newfoundland Society—a distinction that means she must kiss a cod fish and down a shot of Newfoundland screech this coming January? It’s quite an opportunity, even if all it took was making a few buddies among the Mount Allison contingent from the Rock. “I know it’s an honour,” says Tinarwo, 20, a soft-spoken secondyear arts student, “but I’m a little nervous about it, too.”

The opportunity to suck face with a fish ranks way down the list of reasons why Mount Allison—Canada’s top Primarily Undergraduate university for 10 straight years—is such a magnet for new students. The word is out about the little university in the caught-in-a-time-warp town of Sackville, N.B.: fully 69 per cent of Mount Allison students come from outside the province, and there was a 92-percent hike in international applications for this fall. In fact, the admissions department had to turn away two out of three students vying for the 729 first-year positions. End result: the average entering grade was a whopping 85.4 per cent. And with 42 Rhodes Scholars among its alumni, Mount Allison boasts the highest number per capita of any university in the Commonwealth.

What’s so special about Mount Allison? For their $4,610 tuition, students get to attend a quaint liberal arts and science institution that offers an experience far different from the anonymity of a huge urban university. “Everybody knows your name,” says Loren McGinnis, 23, a fourth-year arts student from Vancouver and president of the Students’ Administrative Council. “You want to find your prof, they’re at the coffee shop sitting next to you.”

At close-knit, intimate Mount Allison, where all students seem to throw themselves into university life, there are many opportunities to flourish, from helping

developmentally challenged children to forging a plan to make the campus environmentally friendly. It helps that the university, with students from 39 different countries, is surprisingly cosmopolitan. Tinarwo lives off campus in a house she shares with six other students from Kenya, Ethiopia, Nepal and India. Mount Allison has money, too: after battling back from near-bankruptcy in the early 1990s, it has spent $30 million in the past five years sprucing up the campus, which already includes an enviable art gallery.

New president Wayne MacKay, a

former law professor at Dalhousie University in Halifax who was officially installed just last month, knows staying on top means more than just sticking to the tried and true. He wants to maintain and recruit top-drawer tenure-track professors, and review and revise course offerings to meet the needs of students. One thing that won’t change: the intimate size of the university, which, at 2,300 full-time students, is smaller than many urban Canadian high schools. “The human scale of everything,” says MacKay, “is part of what makes Mount Allison special.” EI3

PRIMARILY UNDERGRADUATE

The Primarily Undergraduate universities are those largely focused on undergraduate education, with relatively few graduate programs

Average

Entering

Grade

Proportion Proportion Out Of With 75% Who Province

Or Higher Graduate (1st Year)

International Student

(1st Year) Awards

Class Sizes: 1st And 2nd Year Level

1 Mount Allison

2 St. Francis Xavier

3 Trent

4 Acadia

5 Winnipeg

6 Bishop’s

7 Wilfrid Laurier

8 Lethbridge

9 Saint Mary’s

10 St. Thomas

11 Moncton

12 Brock

13 Lakehead

14 UNBC

15 UPEI

16 Mount Saint Vincent

17 Nipissing

18 Laurentian

19 Ryerson

20 Brandon

21 Cape Breton (UCCB)

9

12

11

15 21 10 18

13

14 17 19*

16 19*

1

4

17*

6

2

7

3

9*

12*

5

11

14 19 9*

15

17*

21

12*

20

16

2 13 1

3 2 5

16 5 14

6 7 4

4 14 19

7 12 2

1 3 17

9 9* 6*

14 17* 8

5 19 3

10 1 10

15 11 20

17* 4 16

13 N/A 13 17* 15 6*

8 16 9

12 6 21

20 17* 18

11 8 15

19 20 11

21 9* 12

5* 1

9 3*

12* 5

2 2

12* 6*

1 9*

20 14

5* 12*

3 12*

17 18*

4 8

11 15

18 9*

19 6*

8 3*

15 17

21 18*

10 9*

7 18*

16 16

14 21

14 9 1

13

11

3

20*

16*

16*

18

5*

15 12 19 7* 10 7* 5*

20*

4 2

Class Sizes: 3rd And 4th Year Level

4*

6*

1

16*

9*

6*

18*

12*

16*

18*

9*

9*

20

15

12*

12*

4*

21

2

3

Classes Taught By Tenured Faculty

16

4

17 20 11 7

19

15

12

9

21

10

18

13 2

14 1 6

Indicates a tie. Full description of the methodology, page 30.

REPUTATIONAL WINNERS

Maclean’s surveyed high-school guidance counsellors, university officials, heads of organizations, CEOs and recruiters at corporations across the country.

Highest

Quality

1. Acadia

2. Mount Allison

3. Wilfrid Laurier

4. St. Francis Xavier

5. Ryerson

Most

Innovative

1. Acadia

2. Ryerson

3. Wilfrid Laurier

4. Mount Allison

5. St. Francis Xavier

Leaders of Tomorrow

1. Acadia

2. Ryerson

3. Mount Allison

4. Lethbridge

5. Wilfrid Laurier

Best

Overall

1. Acadia

2. Ryerson

3. Mount Allison

4. Wilfrid Laurier

5. St. Francis Xavier

Faculty

With

PhDs

8

9 7 1

13

17

5

18

2*

4

19

2*

10

6

14 12

15 11

20

16 21

Awards

Per

Full-time

Faculty

4

11*

1

11*

6

11*

11*

2

11*

5

11*

8*

3

7

10

11*

11*

8*

11*

11*

11*

Social Sciences & Humanities Grants

4

3

14

7

17

5

16

2

18

15

9

12

6

10 13 21 20 19 11

1

Medical/

Science

Grants

5

3

2

13

7

20

6

1

10

N/A

14

4 9

8

15 19 18 12 11

16 17

Operating

Budget

1

6

4

7

18

5

20

11

14 13 16 21

8 3 2 17

9

10 12 19

15

Scholarships & Bursaries (Percentage Of Budget)

10

11

1

15

17

4

2

18

13 6

14

7

5

19 12

16

8 3 9

20

21

lili

Student Services (Percentage Of Budget)

16

14 12

3 1 7 2

9

5

19

6

10 21

20 18

4 17 11

15 13

Holdings

Per

Student Acquisitions Expenses

Alumni Reputational

Support Survey

2*

8

10

1

20

9

15 11

17

4 7

19

12

5

6

14

16 13 21

2*

18

10

5

19 4

13

14

15

16 18 17

6

7 2 1

8 3 9

12

11

21

20

4

12

7

9 3 2

13

10

14 11

5

6

8

1

17

18 16

15 20 19 21

11

1

6

12

5

4

9

17*

3

10

2

17*

13 N/A

14

15

7

20

17*

8

16

3

5

8*

1

10

14

4 7

6 11 20

8*

16

13

15 12

17 19 2

18

21