World

World Notes

A shooting at the White House

February 19 2001
World

World Notes

A shooting at the White House

February 19 2001

World Notes

A shooting at the White House

U.S. Secret Service agents carry Robert Pickett, 47, an Evansville, Ind., accountant, into hospital after he fired a handgun at the White House and was wounded as they tried to apprehend him. The incident revived the debate about how close the public should be allowed to the presidential residence.

A Canadian confesses to murder

The confessions raised more questions than they answered. On staterun television in Saudi Arabia last week, Canadian William Sampson, 42, and his two alleged accomplices— one British, one Belgian—admitted to planting a car bomb that killed British native Christopher Rodway, 48, and injured his wife in the Saudi capital of Riyadh last November. Canadian officials refused to release any details about the case surrounding Sampson, an

economist working for a Saudi business. But reports suggest the murder may be linked to illicit alcohol sales.

Alcohol is illegal in Muslim Saudi Arabia, and Alexander Mitchell, the British anesthetist accused of masterminding the bombing, allegedly ran an illegal pub for foreigners. Rodway, according to sources in the expatriate community, may have threatened to turn him in. If convicted, the three could be beheaded, although the victim’s family can ask to have the sentence commuted to life in prison. But, said Rodway s father, Jerry, in England, “I believe in an eye for an eye. So be it.”

Aristide returns to rule a divided Haiti

Jean-Bertrand Aristide was sworn in as president of Haiti for the second time in a decade, promising to bring jobs to a country devastated by poverty and violence. The 47-year-old former Roman Catholic priest, who became Haiti’s first elected president in 1990, was ousted by the military seven months into his first term. He was reinstated after an American-led invasion in 1994 and served until 1996. His election is being challenged by a 15-party opposition alliance, which has named a provisional president of its own.

Submarine collision

Rescue teams mounted a search for nine missing Japanese who were aboard a fishing vessel that collided with a U.S. nuclear submarine off Hawaii. Among those unaccounted for on the weekend were four high-school students and two teachers involved in a fisheries training program aboard the Japanbased Ehime Maru, as well as three of its 20 crew. The USS Greeneville came up directly beneath the 55-m fishing vessel.

A fine deal for Kohl

Former German chancellor Helmut Kohl agreed to pay a $215,000 fine to end a 13-month fraud investigation involving his acceptance of $ 1 million in secret donations to his Christian Democratic party during the 1990s. In doing so, Kohl, 70, who has steadfastly refused to name the secret donors, will avoid trial and a possible criminal record.

An imminent arrest

Serbia’s new justice minister, Vladan Batic, said he intends to arrest Slobodan Milosevic, the former Yugoslav president. Milosevic, indicted by the United Nations’ war crimes tribunal in 1999 for crimes against humanity, is expected to be charged with embezzlement, election fraud and discrimination against minorities. He is currendy under 24-hour police surveillance.

Paying the UN

After the United Nations cut membership dues paid by the United States, the U.S. Senate voted to pay $582 million of the nearly $ 1 billion that the United States owes the organization. Under the new arrangement, Washington will pay 22 per cent of the United Nations’ $1.1-billion administration budget, instead of 25 per cent.

Destiny arrives in space

Space shuttle Atlantis docked with the International Space Station, 350 km above the Pacific Ocean, to deliver the U.S.-built science laboratory Destiny. The lab, which cost $2.1 billion, will be used to help astronauts learn more about the effects of radiation and weightlessness on the human body.