People

People

Shanda Deziel March 12 2001
People

People

Shanda Deziel March 12 2001

People

Shanda Deziel

A lover and a fighter

Martin Cummins walked away from his role in the Canadian film Love Come Down with an impressive boxing technique. The movie tells the story of two troubled brothers. Cummins, 31, plays the elder sibling who channels his anger into boxing. Although he trained in the ring for two months, his role required much more than jabs and hooks. And Cummins received a supporting actor Genie for his explosive performance.

In his acceptance speech, Cummins teared up. “My Mom passed away when I was 18,” explains the actor, “and she was so supportive of my acting that I couldn’t help but think of her while I was up there.” Cummins is also a supportive parent. He keeps his five-year-old son—whose name he doesn’t give out—with him in Vancouver while his wife, former Baywatch beauty Brandy Ledford, films a new show in San Diego. Although he’s busy caring for “the lad, ” and is currendy shooting the new Wesley Snipes film, Liberty Stands Still, “I’m still boxing,” he says. “It keeps me from snapping and punching someone out in the grocery store.” Cummins, it seems, is still in character.

Just call her gladiator

Sometimes inspiration is a pay-per-view film away. For curling skip Colleen Jones, it was the movie Gladiator. “Here was a guy getting kicked and stabbed and he kept getting back up to fight again,” says Jones, 41, who watched the movie in her hotel room in Sudbury, Ont., while competing in the recent Scott Tournament of Hearts. After a poor start that put the Nova Scotia team at three wins and four losses in the round robin, she pulled motivation from the film—and from the squad’s coach, Ken Bagnell—to get back on track. “He just told us to play it one rock at a time, one end at a time,” she recalls.

Jones and her teammates made an astounding comeback and won the tournament, sending them to Lausanne, Switzerland, at the end of March. But now the real pressure is on Jones, who doubles as a CBC Morning personality. This will be her third trip to the world curling championships, and she Jones: her squad has yet to take home makes a comeback a medal. “As much as the country minds when we don’t win a world medal in hockey,” Jones says, “in curling it’s blasphemy not to win.”

Ms. Soprano is waiting

Just because Aida Turturro is a part of television’s First Family of mobsters doesn’t necessarily mean she’s a “made” woman. On the hit TV show The Sopranos, “made” men are full members of the family, entided to respect and protection. Turturro, who plays Tony Soprano’s sister, Janice, has no such job security. At the end of last season Turturro’s character got on a bus and headed out of New Jersey. “I didn’t know for seven months if I was coming back,” says the 38-year-

old New Yorker. Turturro did return as a regular cast member in season three—which begins airing on The Movie Network this week—but now that it has wrapped, she’ll once again play the waiting game.

Turturro, who is the first cousin of actor John Turturro CBarton Fink), had a supporting role in a 1992 Broadway revival of A Streetcar Named Desire opposite James Gandolfini—the actor who plays Tony Soprano. They stayed friends. “James told me I should audition for the part of his sister,” says Turturro. “He knew I could aggravate him.”