People

People

Shanda Deziel April 2 2001
People

People

Shanda Deziel April 2 2001

People

Shanda Deziel

Blisters in Borneo

Bob Faulkner and Carys Evans aren’t exciting enough for American TV. As members of a Vancouver-based Eco-Challenge team, Faulkner, 53, and Evans, 27, along with teammates Rob Hartvikson, 48, and Adrian Rothwell, 29, climbed, biked, hiked, swam and paddled through the jungle, rivers and ocean of Malaysian Borneo. But they didn’t do much bitching—or seriously injure themselves. So while Canada’s Discovery Channel will air their 10-day adventure from April 1 to 5, the American network that followed them dropped them from its broadcast. “The U.S. network wanted more agony and ecstasy,” says Faulkner. “We worked hard, but we didn’t have gory injuries or huge blowups between team members.”

For Evans, Borneo was her first Eco-Challenge—she had problems in the jungle at night and with the leeches. “But the beautiful daytime views kept me going,” she says. “I didn’t want to be anywhere else—no matter how many blisters I had.” Graphic-arts consultant Faulkner was the oldest participant in the event, his fifth Eco-Challenge. In Morocco

two years earlier, Faulkner was pulled out of the race when his team feared he was having a heart attack. He was severely dehydrated. “I came to Borneo,” he says, “with a monkey on my back.” Faulkner and his Borneo teammates placed 22nd out of the 44 teams that finished. They plan to compete at the next Eco-Challenge in New Zealand, proving that what this team lacks in excitement, they make up in tenacity.

Anointed by the King

When Canadian-born director Bryan Michael Stoller pulled up to Michael Jacksons Neverland Valley Ranch last July, he was nervous about meeting the selfproclaimed King of Pop. But any such feelings were dispelled before Jackson uttered a word. “When the gates opened,” Stoller says, “Michael was standing there in T-shirt, track pants and sandals. We jumped into his Peter Pan electric car and headed to his 60-seat .» movie theatre.”

I Jackson had invited Stoller, 40, I to his home for a private screening I of Undercover Angel, Stoller s most I recent TV movie. After the film, Jackson asked Stoller, who grew up in Ottawa before moving to Los Angeles 20 years ago, if he would co-direct a movie with him—a true story about an orphan. Stoller, who has more than 70 directorial credits, is now working on the screenplay for the $ 15-million film. Production is set for late spring, and Jackson will write most of the sound track. Ottawa meets Neverland: what a concept!

From jock days to all that jazz

In high school, Laura Hubert

was a jock. But after graduation, the onetime athlete of the year hung up her sneakers and enrolled at the University of Toronto. There, she searched out fellow student and pianist Peter Hill, and the two would run through the standard jazz and blues repertoire. “Someday,” Hubert told Hill then, “I’m going to put on a dress and really sing these songs.”

She’s all dressed up now. At 41, Hubert is a regular in Toronto jazz clubs and has reconnected with Hill on a new CD, My Girlish Ways. Injecting the standards with a distinct bluesy-vergingon-country feel, the Toronto native has altered her sound—and clothing. Ten years ago, she wore jeans and rode the success of the Leslie Spit Treeo—who won a

Juno Award for the most promising band in 1990 but split up in 1998. “We were on the road all the time,” says Hubert. “We couldn’t think straight by the end.” But today, she exudes calm self-reliance: “I just don’t worry. I don’t have to conquer the world. ” Not when an older, wiser and decidedly more mellow Hubert has so clearly made her peace with it.