BACK TALK

Film

Matt gets macho, Colin cruises

JOHN INTINI,Brian D. Johnson August 2 2004
BACK TALK

Film

Matt gets macho, Colin cruises

JOHN INTINI,Brian D. Johnson August 2 2004

Film

Matt gets macho, Colin cruises

THE BOURNE SUPREMACY

By masterfully reprising the role of amnesiac assassin Jason Bourne, Matt Damon has created a franchise— the second instalment being as satisfying as the original, The Bourne Identity (2002). This time around Bourne finds himself hunted by both the CIA and Russian mobsters, with the plot taking a back seat to the action. Based on Robert Ludlum’s trilogy of espionage, the film is essentially one long chase scene that’s exhilaratingly shot and edited with jerky camera movements and quick cuts. Joan Allen shines as a tough-asnails CIA official who’s determined to bag Bourne. But like the first film, Supremacy (pictured below) belongs to Damon. And he doesn’t disappoint-maintaining a level of intensity that would impress even the coldest of trained killers. JOHN INTINI

A HOME AT THE END OF THE WORLD The ménage à trois has come a long way from Jules et Jim. High-school soulmates in 70s Cleveland-where they do acid and each other-Bobby (Colin Farrell) and Jonathan (Dallas Roberts) reunite as adults in Manhattan during the ’80s. Bobby moves in with Jonathan, who pursues a promiscuous gay lifestyle while their frustrated roommate, Clare (Robin Wright Penn), falls for Bobby. The performances are solid. As a sexually confused naïf, Farrell (who has the bushiest eyebrows in showbiz) softens his macho edge with lots of guyon-guy smooching. Sissy Spacek is a treat as Jonathan’s mom, who teaches Bobby to make the perfect pie crust. But this tragicomic saga, which Michael Cunningham ( The Hours) adapted from his own novel, suffers from a sense of freeze-dried compression. And in his feature debut, Broadway director Michael Mayer keeps using montage and pop music to paper over the narrative cracks. The result feels oddly conventional-straight eye for the queer movie. BRIAN D. JOHNSON