CANADA

CANADA

MICHAEL DE ADDER September 5 2005
CANADA

CANADA

MICHAEL DE ADDER September 5 2005

CANADA

MICHAEL DE ADDER

TERROR LAW As in Britain and the U.S., Canada’s Supreme Court will hear a challenge to this country’s national security certificate, a procedure that allows Ottawa to indefinitely hold alleged security threats and deport them without disclosing the evidence against them to anyone but a judge. The test case involves Montrealer Adil Charkaoui, a Moroccan jailed for 21 months on allegations he was seen in an al-Qaeda

ALBATROSS For some, apparently, a symbol of eternity, this bird adorns a statue of Diana and her boyfriend Dodi AI Fayed, who died together in a Paris car crash in 1997. It is to be displayed in Harrods, the London store owned by AI Fayed’s conspiracy-believing father.

training camp in Afghanistan. One of five Muslims held as a security risk, Charkaoui denies the charges and was released in February after four hearings, and several prominent Canadians put up money for bail.

TOBACCO ADS Quebec’s Court of Appeal struck down part of a federal law prohibit-

ing cigarette companies from advertising at sporting and cultural events. Tobacco companies are still banned from producing lifestyle ads. But the court said if the law can’t stop biker gangs from wearing their colours, it shouldn’t be able to outlaw any firm lending its name to a public event.

SALMON For the first time, there will be no commercial sockeye fishery on B.C.’s once abundant Fraser River, federal officials decreed. Blaming higher than usual ocean temperatures and overfishing in the past, only about five million salmon are making their way back to spawn, less than half what conservation authorities had expected.

MICHAËLLE JEAN The continuing controversy over whether the new governor general flirted with Quebec separatists in the past seems to be taking a toll on her popularity. A new poll by Decima Research saw support for Michaëlle Jean’s appointment plunge from 59 to 38 per cent over a twoweek period. However 56 per cent said her previous sentiments shouldn’t bar her from the job if she’s committed to Canada today.

UKRAINIANS In a fit of wartime fervour, Canada interned approximately 5,000 Ukrainian-Canadians during the First World War. Some were forced to do hard labour, and had their property confiscated. Describing it as a dark day in Canadian history, Paul Martin made a formal apology during a visit to Regina. Ottawa is offering $25 million to the Ukrainians and other groups for memorials and educational exhibits.