EAT, DRINK AND BE FABULOUS

Nigella’s dipping sauce, Nick Hornby’s fave new book, the Carlyle’s drink du jour, plus Kevin Smith on movies, Ben Mulroney on shopping, and more: An experts’ guide to summer fun

August 14 2006

EAT, DRINK AND BE FABULOUS

Nigella’s dipping sauce, Nick Hornby’s fave new book, the Carlyle’s drink du jour, plus Kevin Smith on movies, Ben Mulroney on shopping, and more: An experts’ guide to summer fun

August 14 2006

EAT, DRINK AND BE FABULOUS

Nigella’s dipping sauce, Nick Hornby’s fave new book, the Carlyle’s drink du jour, plus Kevin Smith on movies, Ben Mulroney on shopping, and more: An experts’ guide to summer fun

CHEF’S SECRET: FOOD EVEN WE CAN MAKE

MMMM... BUTTER

Dufflet Rosenberg, chef/owner of Dufflet’s café in Toronto, suggests making a batch of butter tarts, with butter—what a concept. “Make your pastry with butter. Don’t make it with shortening! People think that flaky pastry has to be made—and they’re not wrong about that—and it is flakier when you use the shortening product. But I think you can get a really flaky, delicious pastry with butter. You know how people are always eating pies and they leave the pastry? Not when I make it with butter.”

‘WHIZ-BANG’ CHICKEN À LA NIGELLA

Culinary personality Nigella Lawson—author oí How to be a Domestic Goddess and Feast: Food That Celebrates Life—recommends roast chicken with a Vietnamese dipping sauce. “I can never think of anything I love eating more than roast chicken. It’s welcoming, com-

forting, the simplest but nevertheless an emphatic feast. But it can be good to add a little edge. By just stirring together a few ingredients, you have—without any effort to speak of—a fiery, fabulous sauce that elevates a home supper into a whiz-bang dinner dish.”

Roast chicken with dipping sauce

l chicken, approx. 3lb. l tbsp. olive oil

1 tbsp. coarse sea salt

Dipping sauce

2 cloves garlic, minced or crushed

2 fresh Thai bird chilies or other red chilies, finely sliced 2 tbsp. very finely minced ginger 1/4 cup fish sauce 2 tbsp. lime juice (about 1 lime) 1/4 cup water 1/4 cup sugar

Preheat the oven to 400° F.

Sit the chicken in a roasting pan and rub all over with the oil, and then sprinkle over the sea salt. Roast in the oven for one hour and 15 minutes, or until the juices run clear when you jab the area where the thigh meets the body.

Put on a carving board and let sit for 10 minutes. Mix dipping sauce ingredients together and put in a bowl or a couple of little bowls (less passing at the table) with spoon or teaspoons alongside.

Carve the chicken, and serve with the dipping sauce. This would go well with steamed broccoli and some basmati rice.

Serves 4-6

THIS SUMMER GO SOBA

“I like all things noodles,” says Makoto Ono, chef at Gluttons in Winnipeg. “My favourite are soba noodles in a simple soy broth—made from a fish-based

stock. Dried seaweed and dried bonito flakes, flavoured with soy sauce and mirin. What goes well with soba noodle soup is duck. You can either roast a duck breast, or add it into the soup. Then add the duck fat at the end.”

EAT YOUR SPINACH

Rob Feenie, chef/owner of Feenie’s and Lumière in Vancouver, offers a simple summer salad: spinach, goat cheese and prosciutto. “It’s so easy: just throw together the spinach, prosciutto, and crumble the goat cheese on top. The dressing is a simple balsamic and olive oil. Then serve it with some fruit. Right now, I’m serving it with a peach confit. You can use peaches, nectarines— even figs, in the fall.”

SHOP TALK: THE PROS ON WHERE TO SPEND

SHE’LL ALWAYS HAVE PARIS

“French Country in Toronto,” says Jeanne Beker, of FT-Fashion Television, “reminds me of my farm, and the long, lazy lunches I adore hosting there. The delightful home wares and decorative bits and pieces conjure up memories of French charm, and of the

southern French countryside and Paris’s Saint-Germain quarter. I always feel like I’m on a mini vacation when I browse through French Country [6 Roxborough St. West, Toronto]. It makes me feel that although I can only visit France about four times a year, a tiny bit of its romantic spirit has managed to find its way into my city ’hood.”

BERGDORF BUFF

Toronto interior designer Brian Gluckstein heads straight for the furniture floor at Bergdorf Goodman’s, in New York City (5th Avenue; bergdorfgood man.com). “It has the most unbelievable things. It’s a mix of hip modern with cool traditional finds, including antique silver, vintage books, modern Venetian glass and antique chairs.

Also, on this level is one of the hottest restaurants in New York.”

FOR THOSE WOT PARTIAL TO COLOUR

Cobi Ladner, editor of Canadian House &Home, likes Liberty in Vancouver (1635 West Broadway; libertyinside.com). “It’s on two floors, everything from large furnishings to accessories. And everything’s dramatic, because it’s all in black and white. It would be tough to be that edited at home, but you get some ideas. They use things in unusual ways. They’ll use natural items like feathers. Often they’ll use scale and repetition, like a line of candles running down a shelf. They show that you don’t have to buy tons of stuff. A man would like it as well as a woman—it really is that kind of a store, which can be hard to find.”

KEEP THIS OW THE DOWW-LOW

“I’m a chick and summer is high pressure to look fabulous without the benefit of a lot of clothing to cover,” says Elaine “Lainey” Lui, celebrity gossip columnist (laineygossip.com) and correspondent for CTV’s eTalk. “So I go to Kiss & Makeup in West Vancouver [925 Main St.; kissandmakeup.ca]—I even brave the Lions Gate Bridge for this place. They take care of me from head to toe: hair, skin (great bronzers, sunscreens, lip balm, fresh new lip colours, blush for the season), shoulder bag, legs (moisturize, moisturize, moisturize!), laundry (they even sell detergent), and scent. There’s nothing like coming in from a day at the beach, getting showered for the evening, and going out smelling like heaven.”

BEW MULROWEY’S GOT STYLE

“Summer is all about message T-shirts,” says Canadian Idol host Ben Mulroney, “and Gotstyle in Toronto [489 King St. West; gsmen.com\ has my favourite, which states, ‘Guns Don’t Kill People. People With Mustaches Kill People.’ There is also a spa in the back, where a man can get a great massage and straightblade shave.”

DECORATIVE BALLS HALF THE SIZE OF A CAR

Steven Sabados, co-host of the original Designer Guys and Design Rivals, likes Distant Origin in New York City (153 Mercer St.; distantorigin.com). “It’s an eclectic mix of all kinds of furniture and accessories—like they would have a wooden ball that’s almost half the size of a car, beautiful zebra-printed pony-hide chairs and big massive black crystal chandeliers. I guess whoever owns the store travels the globe and finds all these fantastic pieces. It’s very hip Soho New York.”

PARTY AT RALPH’S PLACE

Chris Hyndman, the other half of Designer Guys and Design Rivals, also recommends an N.Y.C. store: “The Ralph Lauren mansion [867 Madison Ave.] has everything. Recently, it was decorated as ‘Villa America,’ which is a very summer, beach-house sort of look, all in navy and white and cane and rattan, materials that are so fresh and summer-like. Every floor does something different. They have the men’s and women’s clothing floor—I pretend these floors are my closets and they’re all my clothes. On the third and fourth floors are the rooms—bedroom, living room, dining room—and all the merchandise around it that you can buy. It’s so beautiful—I fantasize about having a party in there.”

PLACES TO SEE-AND MAYBE BE SEEN, TOO

THE ROAD MOST TRAVELLED

“A midtown New York City sidewalk is my favourite public space of any city,” said Witold Rybczynski, author of The Look of Architecture (among many others) and professor of urbanism at the University of Pennsylvania.

“It’s crowded and heterogeneous. It’s not a contemplative space (like Central Park), or a stirring space (like the Piazza San Marco), quite the opposite. But it’s alive with the buzz of commerce and city life. It’s the most democratic of spaces, in the quintessential

democratic city, where everyone mixes with everyone else: tourist, banker, secretary. It’s the city street par excellence. Republican Rome, 18-century London, 19th-century Paris—they must have been like this. It is the soul of city.”

A PIAZZA SHAPED LIKE A PIE

Margaret MacMillan, author of Paris 1919 and provost of Trinity College at the University of Toronto, has trouble choosing: “I have two spaces in mind: the Philosopher’s Walk in Toronto and the Campo in Siena, Italy. I’ll go with the Campo because I was just there a week ago and it’s fresh in my mind. It’s a pie-shaped, sloping green space where they used to have the horse races. It’s amazing, partly because it’s such a big space but it doesn’t look huge. It’s surrounded by all these rose-coloured buildings. Siena had a very good government, and they tore one poor fellow’s building downbe-

cause it stuck out by something like 10 cm. Inside one of the buildings are these frescos depicting good government and bad government. On the good side, there are people dancing and frolicking, having a good time. On the bad side, there is garbage strewn about, and a dead body. You can see the devil whispering in someone’s ear.”

THE SWAMP IN THE HEART OF NEW YORK

As a Canadian, he hates to say this, but wildlife painter Robert Bateman selected Central Park, in New York City, “ft was once a swamp and a sewage area, and it was created by Frederick Law Olmstead and others to imitate nature, which is basically what I’ve spent my career doing: con-

triving it so that it seems uncontrived. You often get better birding in Central Park than you do on Saltspring Island. Central Park, like Stanley Park in Vancouver, High Park in Toronto, and Mount Royal in Montreal, is a response to developers who would like to pave over everything. Imagine what New York would be without it.”

MUSEUMS—AND MUSCLE MEN

“To choose one space is difficult,” admits Janet Cardiff, the installation artist from Alberta whose audio walks have been staged all over the world. “I’m going to be greedy and swing from one extreme to another. First, Museum Island in Berlin. The best time to see it is at night when the minimalist lighting rakes over the huge columns and pockmarked buildings, creating ominous shadows. The city of Berlin is broke, and renovations haven't been completed on the former east grouping of museums. They appear aged and imbued with romantic patinamuch more interesting than if they had been sandblasted squeaky clean (which I'm sure will happen eventually).

“Venice Beach, Calif., on the other hand, is the epitome of American culture, fully alive with extremes of vanity, body obsession and commercialism, like a carnival where the public is on view, where everyone believes there is a camera somewhere and they are the star. Wander along the beach and watch the hulks lift weights or the rollerbladers dance and spin while the waves crash behind you. Fantastic.”

CULTURE VULTURES SHARE THEIR PICKS

...MUSIC

BETTER THAN DYLAN

Singer-songwriter Ron Sexsmith, whose album Time Being came out in May, chose a kindred spirit: “God’s Footstool, by my favourite songwriter, Kyp Harness. This one had a big influence on me when it came out in the early ’90s. It made me want to write better songs. I went on to record Kyp’s song Thumbelina Farewell on my record Blue Boy. Some people can’t seem to get past his

voice, but I think his phrasing is wonderful, and on some songs he has an urgent, almost machinegun-like delivery that still blows me away. The melodies are great but it’s his lyrics that really set him apart. They are every bit as powerful as the best Dylan, Cohen and Lennon combined.”

THE BLUES AS YOU HAVENT HEARD ’EM

Ageless rocker Randy Bachman recommends an overlooked legend: “One of my favourite albums of all time is Chris Rea’s New Light Through Old Windows. I’ve been a fan of his since the ’70s. He’s huge all over Europe and the U.K. but never broke in North America. The influence he had on Mark Knopfler, myself, Springsteen, becomes very apparent when you listen to this record. His voice is smokey, bluesy and he talks through many of the songs. This past spring I was for-

túnate to see one of his shows in England. His medical condition prevents him from ever touring again. He’s a rare treasure: writer, singer, guitarist, storyteller, rocker and bluesman—all in one.”

WELCOME TO MY CHAMBER

Conductor Pinchas Zukerman

of the National Arts Centre Orchestra recommends an album he knows well: “The disc of Mozart and Brahms quintets with my own Zukerman Chamber Players on Altara. I think of chamber music as sharing ideas and listening in a passionate way to one another. It is reflective of the soul of our society. In the age we now live in, I can’t think of anything more important than having the capability of listening to one another.”

GENRE BENDER

Hip-hop singer Kardinal Off-

ishall, who had three wins at the MuchMusic Video Awards in June, suggests a British soul album with a touch of Latin jazz: “Best by Far, by Omar. This is one of the most inspiring albums I own. It deals with everyday situations and love in a mature fashion. Omar writes, produces and plays on almost all—if not all—of the songs. It is proof that people are still making good music after the 1970s.”

BLUE EYES TALKING

Diana Krall, whose album From This Moment On is due this fall, looks to a classic: “Sinatra at the Sands. It’s my favourite Sinatra record. I love the fact that it is live and that it represents a time that seems to not exist anymore. First of all there’s the Count Basie orchestra. It’s Frank at a time when he was having a great time. You get to hear him talk and it’s almost like a live concert, but it happens to

be one of the great live concerts he did which was on tape. It’s just a great record.”

...MOVIES

and craziness of making a movie at all costs, even if your lead actor dies. I saw it at Cinematheque Ontario, and I had just finished my first feature, Rude. I burst out laughing, and people were looking at me, wondering what was up.

where the director goes nuts and starts flipping through a whole bunch of film books right in the middle of making his own film, as if asking himself ‘What would John Ford do now?’ I had done that on Rude.”

WHAT WOULD JOHN FORD DO?

“La nuit américaine (Day For Night), by François Truffaut,” says Clement Virgo, director of the upcoming Poor Boy’s Game. “The film is about the exhilaration

WORD PERFECT

Great dialogue led Kevin Smith, director of Clerks II, to his choice: “A Man for All Seasons—the Fred Zinnemann film of Robert Bolt’s play about Sir (and Saint) Thomas More. Aside from awesome performances across the boards (not the least of which is Paul Scofield in the role of More, and Robert Shaw as a young Henry VIII), it’s a language lover’s film. If you get off on dialogue, this film is practically porn.”

TAKE THAT, SPAMALOT

Deepa Mehta, director of Water, suggests an award-winning Yugoslav filmmaker: “Time of the Gypsies, by Emir Kusturica—it’s a political, magical film. It is a rare combo—humour, politics and musical!— that would not usually cross your mind.”

SWEET HEARTBREAK

Sarah Polley, director of the upcoming Away From Her, sticks to her Canadian indie roots: “John

Greyson’s gorgeous film Lilies. It’s a fantastical, poignant, visually arresting film. It breaks your heart in the middle of the most absurd moments. It makes you realize your capacity for empathy and suspension of disbelief go far beyond your expectations. It’s a film that has a magical quality and it will be rediscovered many times over the years.”

...READING

REAGAN FOR PREZ?

Nick Hornby, author of High Fidelity and A Long Way Down, offers his favourite novel of the past year or so: “Jess Walter’s Citizen Vince. It’s funny, dark and ingenious; it convinces you that it knows what it’s talking about. And it’s actually talking about quite a lot, in an attractively unassuming way. Vince has been relocated from N.Y.C. to Spokane, Wash., under a witness-protection program, and he has to work two things out. The first is why someone’s trying to kill him; the second is who he should vote for in the 1980 presidential election. One problem is obviously more pressing, but they are given equal consideration. Jess Walter is, I suspect, a novelist to watch.”

THE HILLS ARE ALIVE

Anita Rau Badami, author of the forthcoming Can You Hear the

Nightbird Call?, turns to her homeland: “The Inheritance of Loss by Kiran Desai. This luminous book is set in the Himalayan foothills of India. A rising insurgency forms the ominous backdrop to the characters’ lives. In this lush natural paradise, in a crumbling old house, lives an embittered retired judge and his orphaned teenaged granddaughter. Through her eyes we witness a world where old and new, privilege and poverty, beauty and ugliness rub against each other like pieces of flint, and finally ignite. Desai spins a tale

SEVEN SAD LITTLE MEN capture the attention of Seth

that is at once tender and angry, comical and despairing. This is a book that has to be read.”

SIX SAD MEN

“Seven Men, byMaxBeerbohm,” says Seth, the cartoonist and author of the graphic novel Wimbledon Green. “I am a real admirer of Max’s fluid and airy Edwardian caricatures.Until recendy, however, I hadn’t read much of his fiction. What was surprising about reading this collection of short stories was how wonderfully like his drawings his prose was—fluid, droll, and elegant. This group of stories spotlights six turn-of-the-century fictional

men-little sad men, mostly failures of some type or other—cleverly told by a genuine wit. The seventh man is, of course, Max himself. Funny, but not without real feeling.”

A CASE OF MURDER, A CASE OF SCOTCH

Who can resist the boozy charms of Nick and Nora Charles? “I bought Dashiel Hammet’s The Thin Man in the airport two days ago,” says Lisa Moore, author of Open and Alligator, both Giller Prize nominees, “and it’s funny, quick and ultra-stylish and has vivid characters who drink a lot

ommend James Salter’s Last Night because the prose is transparent and sharp and sexy and dangerous and Michael Winter’s The Big Why for the same reasons.”

ALL ABUZZ

Mystery writer and forensic anthropologist Kathy Reichs (Break no Bones) offers her last find: “I just finished reading The Secret Life of Bees and was thoroughly

charmed. Humour. Southern ambience. Endearing characters-the heroine a modern-day Huck Finn on a South Carolina quest. In Sue Monk Kidd’s tale, Old Dixie and her native daughter both struggle toward a new awareness.”

AN ENGLISH PROUST?

Booker Prize nominee Sarah Waters (Fingerstnith) admits she’s cheating: “The book I would recommend is really 12 books: it’s the A Dance to the Music of Time sequence by Anthony Powell. Powell is often called the English Proust, because of his preoccupation with the passage of time and the workings of memory; in A Dance he builds recurring characters and scenes into a meditation on love, friendship and politics that’s both achingly poignant and tremendously funny. A brilliant read.”

MONKEY BUSINESS

“Summer is the perfect time for people watching,” says Robert Sawyer, the award-winning science-fiction author of Mindscan. “Nothing makes that more entertaining than recognizing the basic primate behaviour we exhibit in groups, in interactions with our own gender and with the opposite sex. Our Inner Ape, by Dutch primatologist Frans de Waal, lets you see the hidden chimp, bonobo, and gorilla lurking in the background. Witty, charming, and deeply compassionate, de Waal enlightens while he entertains.”

BAR STARS: THE DRINKS TO ORDER

HANGIN’ TEN AT THE SAVOY

Swanand Korgaonkar, bartender at the American Bar at London’s Savoy hotel, recommends the Hang Ten, made with raspberry purée, fresh lime juice, Bacardi rum, a tinge of sugar syrup, frozen in a highball glass. “It’s a fun, re-

freshing summer drink, a bit of a bite compared to the classic daiquiri.” x

VIVA LA REVOLUTION

José Ortiz, of Bemelmans Bar at the Carlyle hotel in New York

City is fond of the Old Cuban, a sophisticated version of the classic mojito. “Use eight-year-old Bacardi rum, muddled mint, simple syrup, fresh lime juice, bitters, topped with a splash of Roederer champagne. Nice and light for summer.”

CLASSIC HOTEL,

TRENDY DRINK

“Everyone loves fancy fruity drinks in the summer,” says Ramond Panneton, from the Montreal Ritz-Carlton. “The lychee martini is a popular take on the classic martini: vodka and lychee liqueur, shaken and garnished with a slice of lychee fruit.”

THE MARGARITA’S MUCH STRONGER COUSIN

Bartender Andria Dolphin, from the Standard hotel in L.A., suggests a Pátron Gimlet on the rocks. “Pátron tequila and Rose’s lime juice. It’s a stripped-

down margarita without all the fuss and it’s less acidic-nice and strong.”

BET ON THE CRAZY GOOSE

Ross Riley, bartender at Tao Lounge at the Venetian in

Las Vegas, won a contest with his creation, the Crazy Goose— a combination of Grey Goose orange vodka, Apple Pucker liqueur, . ; a splash of cranberry juice, Chambord liqueur and any energy drink. “It’s easy to make and energy drinks are super trendy these days—particularly at a place like Tao that is also a nightclub.”

DRINKS AT MYNT TASTE LIKE CANDY

Hardeep Sangha from Calgary’s hot nightclub Mynt Ultralounge

recommends a shooter that’s half Captain Morgan rum and half Butter Ripple schnapps. “It’s not too hard, not too soft, tastes like a Werther’s chocolate.”

WHICH WINE FOR SUMMERTIME?

Trust the author of Red, White and Drunk All Over, Natalie MacLean

(:nataliemaclean.com), to pick the perfect summer vintage: “My favourite wine is the one someone else is paying for. If I have to shell out for a wine in the summer, it’s got to be refreshing and fruity, like Vineland Estates SemiDry Riesling from Niagara ($13). It has a wonderful lemony tang that makes it a great aperitif or an ideal partner for seafood and salads. You really don’t need to pay a lot for a great wine these days. Cheers!”

BOURBON SOUR,

CANUCK STYLE

Melanie Splatt,

a bartender at Toronto’s Drake Hotel is very particular about her ingredients for a bourbon sour:

a“Wild Turkey or Maker’s Mark bourbon, but never rye; freshsqueezed lemon, never bar mix; real Canadian maple syrup; shaken, served in a highball glass. A good bourbon has a sweeter vanilla flavour, and the combination of sweet and sour with the hard little edge gives it a nice balance. If made properly it will go right down.” M