NEWSMAKERS

‘I WOULD BE MUCH MORE COMFORTABLE LISA LANGE, ON DISAGREEMENT OVER THE PROMOTING EATING ROADKILL’—A PETA OFFICIAL, NIMAL-RIGHTS GROUP’S PRIZE FOR SYNTHETIC MEAT

May 5 2008
NEWSMAKERS

‘I WOULD BE MUCH MORE COMFORTABLE LISA LANGE, ON DISAGREEMENT OVER THE PROMOTING EATING ROADKILL’—A PETA OFFICIAL, NIMAL-RIGHTS GROUP’S PRIZE FOR SYNTHETIC MEAT

May 5 2008

‘I WOULD BE MUCH MORE COMFORTABLE LISA LANGE, ON DISAGREEMENT OVER THE PROMOTING EATING ROADKILL’—A PETA OFFICIAL, NIMAL-RIGHTS GROUP’S PRIZE FOR SYNTHETIC MEAT

NEWSMAKERS

INGRID NEWKIRK PETA'S PRIZE FOR BEST FRANKENCHICKEN

The inhumane killing of animals for food is wrong, contends People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA)—so the animal rights group is offering a $1-million reward to the first scientist to produce test-tube chicken suitable for sale to the public by 2012. Despite her personal support for the idea, president Ingrid Newkirk says it has caused a “near civil war” inside PETA. Many members abhor the idea of any flesh being eaten, including testtube meat. But if it could protect animals from suffering, Newkirk says, it would be “a godsend.” The idea has its supporters outside the animal welfare community-scientists have been working to develop meat-like tissues without the land and resources necessary for livestock. Yet Newkirk is bracing for a schism inside the often-belligerent ranks of animal-rights activists. One naysayer is a PETA vice-president, Lisa Lange: “Animals are not ours to eat. I would be much more comfortable promoting eating roadkill.”

JIMMY CARTER COLD SHOULDER IN THE PROMISED LAND

The elder statesman’s “study mission” to the Middle East started out with low expectations, and a chilly welcome from Israel. Prime Minister Ehud Olmert said he was too busy to meet with Jimmy Carter, the man who brokered the country’s 1979 peace deal with Egypt. In an indication of priorities, the PM had found time the month before to grip and grin with Wentworth Miller, star of TV’s Prison Break. The Israelis were peeved by Carter’s reaching out to Hamas, and by a meeting with the Palestinian group’s leader, Khaled Meshaal. But Carter made news on his return to Jerusalem, declaring the militant group is now ready to accept “a Palestinian state on the 1967 borders if approved by Palestinians,” thus tacitly accepting Israel’s existence and its right “to live as a neighbour next door in peace.” Too bad both the U.S. and Israeli governments don’t think Carter is ready for a return to prime

JOSE THEODORE YESTERDAY’S MVP: BACK TO HIS OLD SELF?

A year ago, hockey fans wondered whether Jose Theodore had any future left in the game. A miserable season in net for the Colorado Avalanche had the team considering buying out his contract, the nadir of a career that sparkled in 2002 when he’d been the NHL’s MVP and worshipped by millions of fans. Since then, however, Theodore has struggled through controversy. In 2003, photos surfaced of him posing with members of the Hells Angels, and in 2005 his father and brother pleaded guilty in a loansharking scheme; he failed a drug test before the 2006 Olympics (the banned substance was a prescription hair-loss drug he had been taking for eight years); and his long-time girlfriend dumped him later that year after he was photographed canoodling with Paris Hilton. On Saturday night, however, Theodore could celebrate—his old form was on display as the Avs knocked the Minnesota Wild out of the playoffs, a first-round

MOON BLOODGOOD THIS TERMINATOR IS GETTING HOTTER

Perhaps Maxim magazine’s annual “Hot 100” list of scantily clad babes isn’t just about T&A. If Moon Bloodgood’s career trajectory is any indication, it’s also a sort of Billboard chart for Hollywood starlets. The former Los Angeles Lakers cheerleader eked onto the list in 2005 at No. 99 a year after playing the slight, generic role of “Gorgeous Woman” in Win a Date with Tad Hamilton! In 2007 she appeared in her first leading role in a short-lived TV series, Day Break, followed by a turn on Journeyman—and an appearance in Maxim’s top 40. This week came the news that Bloodgood is following in the wake of Linda Hamilton, about to sign to star opposite Christian Bale in the fourth in the blockbuster Terminator series of action films, set for a summer 2009 release. Bloodgood could rise even higher in the rankings this year—with a bullet. A lot of bullets, actually.

TERRY FALLIS THE BEST LAID PLANS ACTUALLY PAY OFF

Aspiring Toronto author Terry Fallis couldn’t find a publisher for his book. So he published it himself, and made it available as a free podcast online. It paid off. The Best Laid Plans—a satirical novel of Canadian politics—is now a finalist for the venerable Stephen Leacock Memorial Medal, which honours Canada’s most humorous book (the winner will be announced April 30). Fallis’s four fellow nominees include such literary heavyweights as Douglas Coupland for The Gum Thief and Will Ferguson for Spanish Fly. Being shortlisted for the prestigious award is “utterly surreal,” says Fallis, 48, president of the Thornley Fallis communications-consulting agency. He drew on his own past experience in politics, including a stint as a full-time Liberal staffer during Jean Chrétien’s failed 1984 leadership campaign. The novel’s narrator is a speech writer who tries to leave politics after catching his girlfriend in her Parliament Hill office late one night, “lobbying [the Opposition House leader’s] caucus.” With a newly acquired literary agent and 500 copies sold, Fallis is now seeking a commercial publisher.

PRACHANDA NEPAL’S PROSPECTS COULD BE ‘TERRIBLE’

Only weeks after initial election results suggested his Communist party had won control of Nepal’s 601-member assembly charged with writing a new constitution, the charismatic Maoist leader Pushpa Kamal Dahal, better known as Prachanda, is demanding that politically inept King Gyanendra step down in what is being perceived as the end of the Himalayan kingdom’s dynasty. But if the people of Nepal expect their fortunes to suddenly improve, they should think again. Prachanda, whose nom de guerre means “terrible,” leads the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) and is responsible for launching a brutal civil conflict in 1996 that killed 13,000. Under him, the Maoists are said to have used threats and extortion to get their way, and have reportedly killed civilians openly critical of party leaders. The recent election may have been stolen through Maoist intimidation of voters. The Maoists hint that if

CASSI MCKAY HARRY POTTER AND THE INSURANCE GIRL

Harry Potter actor Daniel Radcliffe was enchanted the minute

he spotted a mysterious blond beauty at the Australian Film Institute Awards last year in Sydney. “She had these eyes that just looked at me like she wanted to pounce,” rhapsodized the rich and single star. “She stared at me the whole night and I was going to get her number and then I couldn’t

find her. I just walked around that party for an hour, like some sad pathetic dweeb.” Finally, the woman has been identified as a

20-year-old insurance broker named Cassi McKay. Coincidently, McKay is about to start a fourmonth holiday in London. While she’s hoping to meet Radcliffe in England, a romance, however star-crossed, between the Aussie and the rich actor doesn’t look

likely: McKay already has a boyfriend. But if the chemistry is still there, maybe Hogwarts creator J.K. Rowling could give Radcliffe a magical recipe for a love potion?

FERNANDO LUGO SOUTH AMERICA’S LATEST POPULIST

After 6l years of one-party rule in Paraguay, Fernando Lugo and his Patriotic Alliance for Change have won control. Notorious as

a country stagnating even as neighbouring Brazil surged ahead, Paraguay endured decades of control by the Colorado Party headed by military strongmen and later, civilians. It was a cozy arrangement as far as a small economic elite was

concerned. Lugo is from outside that circle. A missionary who toiled in Ecuador for five years, 56-year-old Lugo eventually became the bishop for more than a decade, before resigning to enter politics. His experience formed his political aspirations, advancing the interests of longignored poor farmers and indigenous Paraguayans. Although he distances himself from fel-

low South American populists, Lugo intends to copy Bolivia’s Evo Morales in demanding more money for energy exports. As Lugo told his supporters in the capital of Asunción, “I invite Paraguayans of all political types to help this country that was once great be great again.”