March 1, 1911

FICTION

The Trail of ’98

FICTION

The Thief

CANADIAN SPECIAL ARTICLES

David Thompson: Explorer

The Trail of ’98 8283
FICTION

The Trail of ’98

Author of “The Songs of a Sourdough” and “Ballads of a Cheechakc "
The Thief 2223
FICTION

The Thief

HE’D ’a swiped the nuts off his own wagon, if he’d had one,” said Shorty MacLean, “He’d ’a robbed a bank if. he’d thought he could ’a done it neatly. He was a’ artist at thievin’—steal the hair off ’n a doggie without the doggie knowin’ it, and now—he’s dead, him and Stripes.”
David Thompson: Explorer 6465
CANADIAN SPECIAL ARTICLES

David Thompson: Explorer

IT gives me a great deal of pleasure to have the opportunity of submitting a few of the facts on which I venture to claim that David Thompson, of whose achievements but little note has been taken, was the greatest land geographer that the British race has produced.
Past One, at Rooney's 4243
FICTION

Past One, at Rooney's

ONLY on the lower East Side of New York do the houses of Capulet and Montagu survive. There they do not fight by the book of arithmetic. If you bite your thumb at an upholder of your opposing house you have work cut out for your steel. On Broadway you may drag your man along a dozen blocks by his nose, and he will only bawl for the watch; but in the domain of the East Side Tybalts and Mercutios you must observe the niceties of deportment to the wink of an eyelash and to an inch of elbow room at the bar when its patrons include foes of your house and kin.
THE BEST FROM THE CURRENT MAGAZINES 112113
REVIEWS

THE BEST FROM THE CURRENT MAGAZINES

EUROPEAN snobbery in Asia rouses the protest of Melville E. Stone, General Manager of the Associated Press, and in an article in the National Geographic Magazine (Washington) he sets forth facts that should make the average European or American blush for his ideals.
A New Town for an Old One 3233
CANADIAN SPECIAL ARTICLES

A New Town for an Old One

IN a thousand years Highton had accumulated forty thousand people, a slum, and thirteen charitable organizations; a mile of elegant little shops, four parish churches, one castle frowning over the town and one cathedral that had the ancestral qualities of all the other things summed up in a single poem of stone, history and imagination.
WHO BETRAYS HER? 120121
REVIEWS

WHO BETRAYS HER?

AGAIN we reproduce in condensed form, an - article from _ Pearson’s Magazine, on a sex topic. It is a pertinent article—too pertinent, some people may say. Look at the great stores, the great factories—yes and the little one? too—look at the horde of unskilled girl? they employ. Consider how much these employers pay these girls.
Canadian House Architecture 9697
CANADIAN SPECIAL ARTICLES

Canadian House Architecture

TO observe from an artistic point of view what the Canadian house expresses, we must first wipe away that anointment with architectural detail, given to the four walls and roof of a house, which is supposed to mark its elevation to the realm of the artistic, and look for that which is of more interest to the Artist—the evidence of himself which the dweller in the house makes on that environment of himself, which he, more than any other, has the power to adjust.
A Tale of Two Families 4849
CANADIAN SPECIAL ARTICLES

A Tale of Two Families

THE reason the place was called “Sunbeam Court” was that no ray of the sun ever by any chance ventured there. If it had, the murk of the night or the fog of the day would have recoiled in terror, as though discovered by an apparition. Casual visitors inquired where the sunbeams were with surprise and amusement—unfamiliar emotions in that place, where the inhabitants were neither surprised nor amused at anything.
THE COMMERCIAL VALUE OF A KING. 118119
REVIEWS

THE COMMERCIAL VALUE OF A KING.

DANIEL L. Hanson has made a remarkable computation — the commercial value of a king. Writing in The World To-day he sets forth the case of King Haakon VII of Norway, and his effect on Norwegian trade. The new era in Norway, says Mr. Hanson, had its inception in the year 1905, and took as its war cry “Norway for the Norwegians.”
February 11911 April 11911