March 1, 1922

PRICED ABOVE RUBIES

TOTEM POLES

THE MARCH HARE

PRICED ABOVE RUBIES 89

PRICED ABOVE RUBIES

IT WAS six-thirty in the evening, and Mrs. Neal was cooking something over her gasjet; an ill-smelling something it was, with a pronounced fragrance of meat-scraps and onion about it. In order to reach the wall-jet, she had balanced her drab little figure on a somewhat rickety about chair, where she now clung and stirred precariously, with her worn old cheeks flushed and her bang awry.
TOTEM POLES 2223

TOTEM POLES

FAR out on the sun-swept ledge of an office window, ten stories above the street, a set of blue prints was burning to a crisp. Nor was that the purpose for which they had been pushed forth a few minutes before by the man who now stood staring downward, his hands half-clenched, his eyes intense with a mixture of longing, sorrow and rebellion.
THE MARCH HARE 1617

THE MARCH HARE

WITH a glance of mingled pride and regret Brunton Fairleystood and looked for a time toward that modest two-storey structure, and listened with far-reading ear to the pleasing drone of motors as a string of cars passed him, reached the street, then spread fan-like to scatter over the broad city.
THE MAUVE MICRASTER 1213

THE MAUVE MICRASTER

THE Thompsons of Templarsbourne, which is probably the most beautiful sixteenth-century house in Kent, take paying guests. The girl who knelt by the big fire in the hall late on a cold Spring afternoon, was one of these—a guest who came frequently.
Wetherell's Romance 2021

Wetherell's Romance

IT WAS in a certain restaurant not a hundred feet from the Strand, where one discovers, on three days of the week, a notable beefsteak pie and drinks one's beer from a pewter mug, that Wetherell observed across the table a thin and distinctly interesting face.
MOSTLY SALLY 2425

MOSTLY SALLY

WHATEVER devastating happenings had been going on in his home, it was plain a moment later that Gerald had managed to survive them, for there came the sound of a dragging footstep, and the door opened. Gerald stood on the threshold, the weak smile back on his face.
TAKING DOWN OUR MEMBERS 1617

TAKING DOWN OUR MEMBERS

THE BUSINESS of the first years of the Canadian parliament was conducted in a happy-golucky fashion. Not only were there no prayers, but from Confederation until 1874 there was no official report of the debates. The first seven or eight years’ history of our parliamentary proceedings must be gleaned from scrap-books (preserved in the Library of Parliament) containing clippings from the various newspapers of the country.
A PEACEFUL SESSION-PERHAPS! 1415

A PEACEFUL SESSION-PERHAPS!

POLITICS are experiencing the calm after the storm. With the elections over and the cabinet carefully selected the chosen of the people are observing a discreet silence. The opposition papers picture a bunch of apprentice statesmen wandering around the corridors locating their offices and trying to think thoughts in keeping with their exalted positions.
GET BEHIND THE PREMIER 67

GET BEHIND THE PREMIER

THE King is Dead—Long Live the King!’ and in the case of Canada, paraphrasing the cry of the old European monarchies, the new ruler happens to be MacKenzie King. I have made no concealment of the fact that if I had been in Canada during the past elections, I would have fought for the Farmers to the last ditch, because in a nation of 8,500,000 essential producers, of whom at no time industrial workers exceed 700,000, the basis of Canada’s prosperity must always be the essential producer.
Ranching on the Bottom of a Lake 1819

Ranching on the Bottom of a Lake

ON a certain day somewhat better than a decade ago a white man, clad in the garb of a pioneer, roamed back and forth around the ragged shores of a wild-looking, mud-bottomed lake in the heart of a gigantic hinterland—a wilderness of hill-flanked plains studded with wooded bluffs which is known today as the Grande Prairie country of Northern Alberta.
February 151922 March 151922