March 15, 1932

FICTION

THE CASE OF THE PAINTED GIRL

FICTION

The Ruin of Louie the Gat

FICTION

WINDJAMMER

THE CASE OF THE PAINTED GIRL 1819
FICTION

THE CASE OF THE PAINTED GIRL

The story: While motoring from London to Scotland at night, Jimmy Harrison is halted at a lonely house by a scream. He enters by a window and finds a recently murdered man; also a girl lying unconscious, her face curiously covered with paint.
The Ruin of Louie the Gat 1617
FICTION

The Ruin of Louie the Gat

ADVENTURES crowd in upon certain people as iron filings gravitate toward a horseshoe magnet or words swarm into a dictionary. My friend Beefy Bannister is like that. Mr. Bannister is a hockey player; a young hockey player. He is huge and pink and blonde, with perfect teeth and hair marcelled by Nature, clean, healthy to boisterousness, and entirely unsophisticated—a commonplace person save for his exceptional athletic prowess.
WINDJAMMER 67
FICTION

WINDJAMMER

SHE lay in midstream, the yellow waters of the ebb licking disdainfully at her rusty flanks—a frowsy, antiquated bark of 1,200 tons or so, with tattered laundry hanging in her ratlines and Hecla, Hull, painted in a curve across her clumsy stern.
THIRTEEN YEARS AFTER 2021
GENERAL ARTICLES

THIRTEEN YEARS AFTER

LEAVING Arras via Ste. Catherine, I passed the concrete shell of a flour mill that was designed as a modern affair to be operated by electricity. It is situated beside the River Scarpe, and after a disastrous fire has never been repaired. A little farther on, across the road from it.
HAVE YOU A FORGOTTEN BANK BALANCE? 1011
GENERAL ARTICLES

HAVE YOU A FORGOTTEN BANK BALANCE?

HAVE you money in the bank? Fifty thousand people in this country have money in the bank—and don’t know it. Are you one of them? The meaning attached to that word “money” isn’t a few cents interest on some old savings account— although even a few cents might be welcome these days— but real money, running to thousands of dollars.
Cultivate a Debutante 1213
FICTION

Cultivate a Debutante

THE team of Weston and Cudlip had come suddenly to the parting of the ways. To Polly Weston it seemed rather silly and childish to break up over a slight misunderstanding and call it the end. No doubt she had been partly to blame and Johnnie had some reason to feel hurt and angry, but to sever their relationship completely seemed unnecessary.
Russia As I Saw It! 1415
FICTION

Russia As I Saw It!

MOSCOW! Again there are crowds, surging and struggling under huge bundles and boxes and bags. Russia is indeed moving. Pre-war Moscow had less than a million population; now it has nearly three million souls—or individuals without souls according to their atheistic attitude.
BACK TO THE LAND 2627

BACK TO THE LAND

BILL SMITH—let us call him that—was a carpenter at Toronto. Back in 1928, when building was brisk and work plentiful, he earned $45 per week, which seemed a good deal better than sweating over potato rows. Bill paid $35 per month rent, gave his wife a generous allowance and the two children pocket money.
Colorful Foods for Springtime 56257
WOMEN AND THE HOME

Colorful Foods for Springtime

A FEW years ago, there was no mistaking the signs of the changing seasons. Spring was unfailingly heralded—straw hats in shop windows, a bottle of tonic on the pantry shelf, and the glad news, “Sap’s runnin’,” after the first few warm days and clear, crisp nights.
Why Not Unite All Nine Provinces? 1011
GENERAL ARTICLES

Why Not Unite All Nine Provinces?

JUDGE TURGEON'S article, “I’d Unite the Prairie Provinces,” affords interesting reading. It is interesting because the author, as a former public man, knows his prairies, and as a present-day jurist views their problems with a measure of judicial detachment.
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