June 15, 1935

FICTION

Track of Destiny

FICTION

Song Recital

FICTION

Trial by Flight

Track of Destiny 1819
FICTION

Track of Destiny

THE STORY: Having failed to borrow money in London for the building of a railroad from Montreal to the Pacific coast, Premier Sir John A. Macdonald persuades a group of Canadian business men to finance the road. In Yale, B.C., to which point the railroad has been constructed from the West Coast, a gambler named Bulldog Kelly stages a card duel with another Kelly, better known as The Rake.
Song Recital 67
FICTION

Song Recital

AT SYMPHONY HALL in Toronto, as in other tribunals of North American culture, a recital by Hedda Martin was no routine occurrence. The same could have been said of the recital halls of New York, Chicago, Vancouver, and all the spaces that intervene.
Trial by Flight 1213
FICTION

Trial by Flight

I LIKED young Doc Nealey the moment I met him. It was at Emerald Lake, where, as chief pilot for Churchill Airways, I spent most of my time. He came out in Bill Harding’s car, with Bill himself and with Bill’s sister, Kay. Bill, by the way, called himself president of the company and, between times, flew one of the Fairchilds.
From Regina To the Yukon 2223
FICTION

From Regina To the Yukon

I HAVE OFTEN been asked why Wascana River was originally called “Pile of Bones’’ and what was the origin of the latter name. A few miles down the river from Regina there is a knoll or butte which commands a wide view of the Regina plain. In the early days when the buffalo ranged the country in vast numbers, Indian hunters constructed a pound adjacent to this knoll, into which, from time to time, they decoyed the buffalo for slaughter.
The Devil Machine 1617
FICTION

The Devil Machine

DEBLETT invented a machine. It was called by those who first saw it the Devil Machine; possibly a pun on the inventor’s name, but afterward people still called it the Devil Machine. When he spoke of it to the General Council, they were amused, but then doctors always are amused at anything new.
Play Your Own Game 1011
SPORT

Play Your Own Game

NOT SO LONG ago a golfer, almost at the end of his patience, observed cynically that, while many professionals made a fair living by giving lessons, few of them wore their heels down from lugging their brains around. He observed further that their theories were often in conflict and that, as far as he was concerned, he could take their advice or leave it alone.
Grand Manan 1819
GENERAL ARTICLES

Grand Manan

THERE ARE dreams go down the harbor with the tall ships of Saint John,” sang Bliss Carman. And a long-cherished dream began to come true a few hours after we, too, had sailed past lighthouse and bell-buoy and saw ahead, rising out of briny seas that leaped and swirled—Bishop Rock.
Cora Hind 1415
GENERAL ARTICLES

Cora Hind

THIRTY-FOUR years ago Winnipeg’s John W. Dafoe shattered journalistic precedent by appointing a woman market and agricultural reporter on the staff of the Manitoba Free Press. Her name was Cora Hind. One day last May, John W. Dafoe, now chancellor of the University of Manitoba as well as editor of the Free Press, faced a crowded convocation in Winnipeg’s new million-dollar auditorium on Memorial Boulevard and placed upon the head and shoulders of Miss E. Cora Hind, commercial and agricultural editor of the Free Press, the cap and gown of a Doctor of Laws.
Parade 64654
HUMOR

Parade

AT LEAST one Canadian National conductor can make himself understood when he roars “A-l-l-a-b-o-a-r-d” the full length of the station platform in Saint John, N.B. Recently from the express air of a train, a small, wiremeshed container of domestic bees was placed on a platform transport, waiting to be shipped to Prince Edward Island.
Dime Daffiness 1011
GENERAL ARTICLES

Dime Daffiness

A MAN once sold another man the Brooklyn bridge. Which is as good an explanation as another of the send-a-dime chain-letter craze which recently, all over this continent, reached the pinnacle of daffiness. For weeks, during April and May, from the Golden Gate to Hell’s Gate, from Sydney to Prince Rupert, people put dimes in letters, mailed them to other people, expecting other people, and more of them, to mail them dimes back.
June 11935 July 11935