August 1, 1954

The Amazing Career of Clare Hincks 1011
Articles

The Amazing Career of Clare Hincks

HARRY (RED) FOSTER, a salesman who can sell so well that he climbed to the presidency of a Toronto advertising agency, is convinced that the greatest salesman and promoter of our age is not a businessman or a huckster but a doctor. His choice for this accolade—and it is shared by many top industrialists is Clarence Meredith Hincks, a tall, slightly stooped, bushy-browed 69-year-old Toronto psychiatrist.
What will the Seaway do to your Town? 67
Articles

What will the Seaway do to your Town?

AS THE first bulldozers and construction crews move in this summer to work on the longdebated St. Lawrence River seaway and power project, Canada hums with forecasts of lusty boom days. Optimism is sky-high and every Great Lakes fishing port is dreaming of mushrooming into another Liverpool.
The Public’s Own Private Eyes 1617
Articles

The Public’s Own Private Eyes

IN A plainly furnished office in a greystone building in Ottawa Clifford W. (Slim) Harvison dictates his memos, reads his mail and studies his staff reports like any other civil servant. He is very tall—almost gangling. His voice is resonant and his personality warm.
What It’s Like to Live in a Lighthouse 2021
Articles

What It’s Like to Live in a Lighthouse

IT WAS the very devil of a winter’s night in 1952. As Margaret Tucker, the wife of the lightkeeper on Gannet Rock, N.B., dried the supper dishes and watched her three small children playing on the kitchen floor, a cacophony of noises assailed her ears.
THE WHITE AND THE GOLD 2223

THE WHITE AND THE GOLD

THERE had always been a conflict of interest over the fur trade. New France offered no other source of revenue to provide for the costs of administration and colonization, and so the proper method of encouraging the traffic was the problem which caused the most knitting of brows among the King’s advisers and the issuance of more regulations than any other point.
The Lady Lawyers who are fighting Napoleon 1213
Articles

The Lady Lawyers who are fighting Napoleon

ALTHOUGH most of the married women of Quebec accept and endorse the restraints imposed on them by the ancient civil laws of their province, Wilhelmina Holmes, a plump and jolly housewife of Montreal, is not one of them. Mrs. Holmes has never felt at ease among the venerable statutes that compel a married woman to obtain her husband’s consent before selling her own property, having an operation or launching a lawsuit.
the best way to murder Aunt Maudie 1819
Fiction

the best way to murder Aunt Maudie

Details details, details, dammit!” he muttered. "Everything goes wrong for me.” Jules Wyckson leaned back in the lawn chair and tried to concentrate on how best to murder his Aunt Maudie, but the noises of the party kept intruding and he frowned in annoyance.
LONDON LETTER BY Beverley Baxter 23
LONDON LETTER BY Beverley Baxter

LONDON LETTER BY Beverley Baxter

YOU WILL agree with me that “Muggeridge” is a name straight out of Dickens. It has a smug sound as if its owner was trying to assume a superior status in provincial society. It also has a materialistic sound as if the man in question might be a severe employer.
BLAIR FRASER BACKSTAGE at Ottawa 23
BLAIR FRASER BACKSTAGE at Ottawa

BLAIR FRASER BACKSTAGE at Ottawa

LOSS-LEADER selling, a form of competition deplored by most retail merchants, is the subject of a report the Restrictive Trade Practices Commission hopes to write during August. The betting in Ottawa is that commissioners will recommend no law to curb this practice and that their criticism of it, if any, will be mild.
MAILBAG 45
MAILBAG

MAILBAG

In Norman J. Berrill’s article, Are We Alone in the Universe? (June 15), I think perhaps he does not sufficiently emphasize the idea of “life as we know it.” We now know life on this earth is vastly more varied and pervasive than was until very recently thought possible.
July 151954 August 151954