September 1, 1956

Editorial

Editorial

FOR THE SAKE OF Argument

FOR THE SAKE OF Argument

London Letter

London Letter

Editorial 23
Editorial

Editorial

The marathon season is drawing to a close and about time, we say. Perhaps this summer was no sillier than most, but it seemed pretty wacky while it lasted. Take the following incidents, all of which took place in the month of July: A man swam across Lake Eric while handcuffed.
FOR THE SAKE OF Argument 45
FOR THE SAKE OF Argument

FOR THE SAKE OF Argument

A tender old friend has drawn to my attention two facts related somehow, he feels. One is that this year is Leap Year and the other is that I am, to quote from his friendly missive, “a slightly ageing spinster,” unquote. He ends his charming note with an airy, “So why not? Why don't you propose? In four more years it might be too late!”
London Letter 67
London Letter

London Letter

Veesibility is good,” said the French pilot. “We shall arrive at Deauville in one hour and one quarter. After the take-off, tea will be sairved. Merci.” The setting was the London Airport and the passengers consisted of ten Britsh members of parliament and their wives.
Backstage at Ottawa 89
Backstage at Ottawa

Backstage at Ottawa

Does the CCF still regard the Liberals as the lesser of two evils and the Conservatives as the greater? Or have most CCF voters begun to feel that it’s time to defeat the Grits, even if a Tory Government replaces them? This is a question raised but not answered by the past session of parliament.
The revolution that’s changing your shopping habits 1011

The revolution that’s changing your shopping habits

An angry Ottawa housewife, brandishing a twenty-nine-cent jar of marmalade, elbowed her way through the afternoon shopping crowd at IGA’s Rideau Street Ottawa supermarket on a recent Friday and accused the store manager of deliberately trying to swindle her.
Will they ever beat the Eskimos? 1415

Will they ever beat the Eskimos?

Freddie Black, a Toronto Argonaut lineman chock-full of muscles, once related that the most unusual day he’d ever spent on the football field was in an exhibition game against the Edmonton Eskimos in the early fall of 1955. “I made nineteen tackles,” Black recalled with mixed pride and dismay, “but not once did I get the guy with the ball.”
We adopted a family of criminals 1617

We adopted a family of criminals

I suppose that what happened to us was the man in our lives — my husband, the Reverend Gordon Phillips. He is a big handsome man, witty, fond of a joke, and he frequently lapses into the language he used as a teen-age private in the Black Watch during World War I.
Remember when we raved about radio? 1819
A MACLEAN'S FLASHBACK

Remember when we raved about radio?

One Monday evening last winter close to sixty million people in North America glued their eyes to their TV screens to watch a ninety-minute repeat performance of Peter Pan. It was the biggest entertainment phenomenon since—well, since radio.
The secret war of Charles Goodeve 2223

The secret war of Charles Goodeve

The phone rang on the desk of Commander Charles Frederick Goodeve, RNVR. in his cluttered office in Admiralty Arch early one morning in February 1942. The caller was the famous physicist Sir Edward Appleton. “I wonder if you could find time to see a man named Hamilton,” he said.
What would Carrie Nation do? 2425

What would Carrie Nation do?

It seemed marvelous that 1, a poor Indian, was actually aiding the Royal Mounted in catching a criminal. “You just walk up to the cabin and knock," my friend Constable Kilroy had said, "and when Hawkins comes to the door you say, ‘I want to buy a bottle.’” I walked up to the cabin and knocked.
August 181956 September 151956