January 19, 1957

Mailbag 4849
Mailbag

Mailbag

Is modern mother overworked? Could she stand grandma’s grind?
A tango and a feast with the Faun 5657
My most memorable meal: No. 13

A tango and a feast with the Faun

Oddly enough, the most memorable meal I ever ate consisted of very little food. The hostess was a famous potter, as well as a painter. Her name was Katrina Buell. The year was 1911 and I was fifteen years old. The place was Paris where I had been taking ballet lessons from the great M. Raymond, master of the Paris Opera Ballet.
The curious case of almost everything 6061
Parade

The curious case of almost everything

My, the strange things you do see across this fair land if you just keep your eyes open. A fellow in Winnipeg saw a woman get out of a car with a pair of her husband’s trousers over her arm, but before she took them into the dry cleaner’s she paused to wipe off the car with them.
Dear Mr. Pickersgill: Thanks for the Hungarian refugees 23
Editorial

Dear Mr. Pickersgill: Thanks for the Hungarian refugees

After having rapped the Canadian immigration department on the knuckles on several past occasions, it is pleasant to be able to slap it on the back on this one. The offer to bring in as many Hungarian refugees as wish to come to Canada is generous, wise and proper.
Your amiable cousin, the sea gull 2425

Your amiable cousin, the sea gull

He can be a wit, a wonderful guy in company and a fine family man. But you can’t count on him. Often he’s dumb and fickle. And, like you, he frequently eats too much and simply can’t mind his own business
Is Meeker TOUGH ENOUGH to lick the NHL? 2223

Is Meeker TOUGH ENOUGH to lick the NHL?

For years Conn Smythe preached mayhem in hockey while hiring gentle coaches. Then, with his Toronto Leafs on the ropes, he hired the rough-and-tumble kind of guy he always raved about
Maclean's Movies 2627
Maclean's Movies

Maclean's Movies

The Silent World: Underwater documentaries are sometimes tedious screen fare but this one is a real spellbinder. It was made by Jacques-Yves Cousteau, leathery skipper of the research ship Calypso, and is an absorbing sight-and-sound diary of his adventures at the bottom of the deep.
How they’re making a hero of Pierre Radisson 1415

How they’re making a hero of Pierre Radisson

Once upon a time Walt Disney, a cartoonistturned-impresario, buffed up a tarnished early-nineteenth-century U.S. hero named Davy Crockett, televised him—and turned him into a kindergarten cult. The cult spread across the undefended frontier into Canada, where it prompted dismay among patriotic adults.
IN THE editors’ confidence 5859
IN THE editors’ confidence

IN THE editors’ confidence

You’ll be seeing us again on TV Those of you who enjoyed seeing three Maclean’s prize-winning fiction stories reappear as television plays last March will be happy to learn that six more of our recent and most popular short stories have been acquired by the networks as TV drama properties.
January 51957 February 21957