June 18, 1960

The mystery of the Merrifield 1617
Fiction

The mystery of the Merrifield

CHICK McALLISTER was cold and miserable and wet. Someone had stolen his sea-boots during his leave and he was standing watch in frozen Wellingtons; the last toggle had been snipped from his duffel coat and he was forced to hold the garment wrapped with his arms to prevent the wind from plucking it from his back; he had been unable to locate his scarf before closing up and the spray and snow in the back of the hood formed a slush which trickled down the ridges of his spine.
Industry's million-dollar hangover 1819
Articles

Industry's million-dollar hangover

PROBLEM DRINKERS in Canada cost their employers an estimated one million dollars every working day. This staggering sum includes the cost of slowed production, absenteeism, accidents, sickness, labor turnover, wasted materials, insulted customers, errors in executive decisions and poor plant morale.
Hliday weekend in MOSCOW 1415
Articles

Hliday weekend in MOSCOW

AS THE BIG Electra left the Baltic Sea behind and headed inland over the USSR. Moscow-bound from Amsterdam, the steward announced on the intercom, in Dutch, English, French and German, that Soviet law prohibits the taking of photographs from a plane.
TRADE: the Soviet's not-so-secret weapon 1213
Articles

TRADE: the Soviet's not-so-secret weapon

THE MILITARY, diplomatic and propaganda tactics that have so spectacularly advanced the cause of international communism during the past two decades have, in most instances, involved Canada only in a minor way. With three oceans as a protective moat, we have so far managed to escape most of the direct consequences of the Soviet Union's bold postwar incursions.
Everything that’s fit to print in every language fit to read 2425
Articles

Everything that’s fit to print in every language fit to read

IF YOU WALK down Queen Street West in Toronto, one of the great immigrant arteries of Canada, you will find squeezed between a Polish millinery shop and a vacant delicatessen an inconspicuous little book-and-cigar store. Its owner, Nicholas Chabal, a small pleasant Ukrainian, sells colorful Ukrainian calendars that bear the faces of stern national heroes and melancholy poets.
The market that won’t sell out to Progress 2021
Articles

The market that won’t sell out to Progress

IN THE METROPOLITAN TORONTO of today, where an upstart second growth of steel and concrete has long since obliterated yesterday, one dingy parochial landmark survives and flourishes surprisingly. It's the shrill, sprawling, jumbled, draughty, crowded old St. Lawrence Market, and on a Saturday it still draws as many as fifty thousand people.
Canada is becoming a mouse that roars 89
For the sake of argument

Canada is becoming a mouse that roars

Canada has done more bragging in the past year than any other country in the world, with the possible exception of Cuba. According to our official spokesmen, Canadians are uniquely virtuous, intelligent and lovable. Canada, they claim, is rapidly emerging as a "world power,” destined to lead the nations along paths of sanity and brotherly love.
Vancouver’s bold but shaky INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL 2829
Articles

Vancouver’s bold but shaky INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL

THE MOST LAVISH but shakiest spectacle in North American show business, the Vancouver International Festival, faces its crucial test this summer. In its third season, the festival must pack ’em in or pack it up. In 1958, Vancouver set out to crash the big leagues of world culture by attempting to mount an annual international festival of the arts that would rival those of Edinburgh and Salzburg and surpass, at least in scope, the yearly Shakespearean spree at Stratford, Ont.
MAILBAG: Bring in Negroes? Some angry answers 45
COMMENT

MAILBAG: Bring in Negroes? Some angry answers

I WISH TO SUPPORT your editorial proposal (May 21) that we should offer refuge to Negroes suffering under the policies of the South African government. However, it should he pointed out that they may suffer severely under the policies and practices of the Canadian people and government too.
Oscar Wilde’s tragedy and the morals of the movies 1011
London Letter

Oscar Wilde’s tragedy and the morals of the movies

The film industry has always been strange, fascinating and irritating. Yet in Britain at least it has seldom been in a state of pitched battle like the one today, which involves two competing major companies that are working like mad to win not merely an Oscar but to be the first with a film based on the tragedy of Oscar Wilde.
June 41960 July 21960