January 2, 1965

The Death and Rebirth of the Martyrs’ Capital 2223

The Death and Rebirth of the Martyrs’ Capital

For three centuries after the holocaust Ste. Marie lay buried and almost forgotten. It had been a Jesuit mission — and key to the French dream of North American empire. Today million-dollar detective saga is rebuilding the community into a top attraction for a whole new breed of sophisticated tourists
How Allan Baker made a million from your 50-cent lunch 1617

How Allan Baker made a million from your 50-cent lunch

ONE DAY IN 1954 two men sat in the outer office of a plant manager in Oakville, near Toronto. They soon found they were both there for the same purpose: to try to obtain permission to install soft-drink dispensing machines in the factory. The older man casually mentioned he had many such accounts.
AIR CRASH: THE LINGERING COST OF DISASTER 2021

AIR CRASH: THE LINGERING COST OF DISASTER

It was November 29, 1963. Air Canada Flight 831 was making a routine 6.15 p.m. businessmen's run from Montreal to Toronto. Suddenly, the plane plunged into a swamp near Ste-Thérèse de Blainville, Quebec. In the crash 118 people died, and the lives and futures of some 100 families were abruptly changed. A year later, the headlines now only a memory, the books are still not closed on Canadas worst air disaster. Here is how a tragedy is measured and how its tangled aftermath affects those left behind
WHAT’S BRITISH TELEVISION GOT? CANADIANS, ALL OVER THE PLACE 3031

WHAT’S BRITISH TELEVISION GOT? CANADIANS, ALL OVER THE PLACE

Bernie Braden, Sydney Newman, Elaine Grand... they’re just a few of the ubiquitous Canadians who dominate British television. They’ve found the success Canada couldn’t offer — but some reasons for remaining Canadian
What CANADA does to the ENGLISH (and vice versa) 1415

What CANADA does to the ENGLISH (and vice versa)

They're everywhere — yet they’re hard to find. They’ve come from an England that’s Mod, not Olde, and live in a country they didn’t expect. They’re part of us — and strangers who can't go home again
THE VILLAGERS WHO WENT TO WAR FOR THEIR TREES 1213

THE VILLAGERS WHO WENT TO WAR FOR THEIR TREES

Officials said the trees must go — and the fight was on. Grandmothers and teenagers of Lambeth, Ontario, mounted guard, boys swarmed in the branches and the author, a professor at the University of Western Ontario, was jailed. The bizarre battle failed — but officialdom lost the war
MAILBAG 4243

MAILBAG

Here is a bonus-size selection of what readers have been glad about, sad about — and, sometimes, just plain mad about — in recent issues
THE OUTSTANDING CANADIANS OF 1964 67

THE OUTSTANDING CANADIANS OF 1964

In most ways, it was a turbulent, anxious year. It was the year of bitter violence in Quebec, of the marathon flag debate and of the new drive to streamline our armed forces, the year when Hal Banks got away and when we finally found a way to bring our constitution home. In the midst of these crises, a few remarkable Canadians, in several fields, were pushing the country ahead and, by their excellence, were distinguishing all of Canada. It is these men - and a Queen - whom Maclean's here celebrates as deserving the special approbation of their fellow citizens
ARGUMENT 4849

ARGUMENT

GLEN HOW warns: minorities who want anti-hate laws are a threat to everybody’s freedom
The Strange Revival of Our Best Bad Poet 1819

The Strange Revival of Our Best Bad Poet

JAMES MCINTYRE wasn't a mediocre poet or an angry poet or even an unimportant one. But he was a gloriously had poet, probably the worst Canada has produced; and through the same process of inverted nostalgia that transforms nineteenth-century junk into contemporary treasures, his poems have become the subject of a tiny but flourishing literary cult.
December 141964 January 231965