May 1, 1965

Anybody can have a boom —but B.C.’s got three 89

Anybody can have a boom —but B.C.’s got three

THERE WAS A TIME when the residents of Prince George, British Columbia, hardly looked twice when a moose wandered out of the surrounding bushland and down the main street. But times have changed, and the moose that ventured within the city limits on a freezing Sunday morning last January proved it.
NORTHERN DANCER: A SECOND CHANCE AT GREATNESS 1415

NORTHERN DANCER: A SECOND CHANCE AT GREATNESS

I cannot write an epitaph for Northern Dancer — because his future could very well be more important to Canadian racing than his past.” The speaker was George F. T. Ryall, better known as Audax Minor, the almost legendary racetrack sage of The New Yorker magazine.
The boy who was born a Grandfather 2021

The boy who was born a Grandfather

IN INDIA, VIOLENT encounters between families, caste groups and even whole communities can flare up so swiftly and for such a variety of reasons, often trivial, that a police officer soon learns to stop the quarrel first and ask questions afterward.
Irrepressible, effervescent, independent state (of mind) 1213

Irrepressible, effervescent, independent state (of mind)

THERE IS A SCHOOL of thought, rapidly gaining credence among people who run provincial governments, which holds that Canada is not, and shouldn’t want to be, a single, united nation so much as an amiable federation of more or less independent republics.
Think you’ve got problems? Try being your own boss! 1617

Think you’ve got problems? Try being your own boss!

AT FOUR O’CLOCK on an October morning in 1936. I sat on the running board of a truck on Toronto’s Jarvis Street and felt like weeping. I was twenty-three years old. Three times I had tried, and failed, to repair that truck’s transmission. Soon dawn would break and the truck was urgently needed by eight o'clock — a construction contract depended on it.
Robert Thomas Allen’s sentimental journeys 4: ITALY 2223

Robert Thomas Allen’s sentimental journeys 4: ITALY

You HAVE TO MAKE at least one mistake on a trip and I pulled a doozer by skillfully plotting my railroad tour of Europe, so that I went through both the French and Italian Rivieras at night. Don’t ask me why. I've forgotten why, although it seemed a brilliant stroke of scheduling at the time.
MAILBAG 67

MAILBAG

IN YOUR March 6 Editorial (It May Sound A Bit Old-Fashioned To Say So, But Patriotism, After All, Is Still Respectable) “one of the most powerful, most thoughtful men in the Canadian government” is quoted as saying, “I am proud to be a Canadian.”
ARGUMENT 6869

ARGUMENT

WHENEVER I get dispirited about the money - chasing rat - race that most adults are said to lead, I take comfort from thinking about a girl I happen to know. She’s sixteen. She gets her hair done every week — it’s expected of her at the high school she attends — and works weekends so she can afford it.
This is sculpture. Will it win us customers in Japan? 1617

This is sculpture. Will it win us customers in Japan?

GEKALD GLADSTONE, the magnificently ambitious, thirty-five-year-old Toronto sculptor and painter, has never actually said, “I am the greatest. I am the prettiest.” That's Cassius Clay’s line. But Gladstone has said, frequently and to anyone who gets within complimenting range of him, “I am Canada’s foremost sculptor, and if there are any contenders for my title they haven't made themselves known to me.”
A GOSSIPY APPROACH TO U. S. HISTORY 6667
MACLEAN’S REVIEWS

A GOSSIPY APPROACH TO U. S. HISTORY

SOCIAL HISTORIES — the kind that tell more about how people lived than what kind of treaties their leaders signed — can be as fascinating as a newspaper gossip column. And in writing The Oxford History of the American People (Oxford University Press, $13.50), Samuel Eliot Morison has drawn heavily on the techniques of the gossip-writers to produce what will almost certainly be this year’s top historical work.
April 171965 May 151965