January 1, 1967

SCHOOL IS FOR NANCY 1617

SCHOOL IS FOR NANCY

THE NEWEST DEVELOPMENT in education in Canada—and the most promising—is the belated recognition that the nation’s schools are wrong, and even destructive, for more than 80 percent of the five million children in them. In the opinion of a growing number of educators, today’s schools fail to educate; their principal effect is to stun.
HERE'S LOOKING AT US 2627

HERE'S LOOKING AT US

Soon, millions will be coming to Canada to see Expo 67 — and us. How will we look to them? Smug, lazy, cold to strangers, prudish about liquor, amateurs at romance—yet kind of nice to know. Who says so? Newcomers to Canada—and they’ve been talking to Robert Thomas Allen
THE OUTSTANDING CANADIANS OF 1966 89
EDITORIAL

THE OUTSTANDING CANADIANS OF 1966

In a year headlined by scandal, ill will and indecision in high places, Canadians can take pride in many less publicized but more constructive achievements of some fellow citizens who in a wide variety of endeavors—including medicine, sports, the arts, sociology and even politics—brought credit and lent vitality to a nation sorely in need of heroes.
'A stranger in my own land' 2425

'A stranger in my own land'

In 1965 the Centennial Commission offered a grant to Gwethalyn Graham and Solange Chaput Rolland that would enable them to continue the bicultural dialogue begun in Dear Enemies. The plan was that both authors should journey together across Canada and record in a diary their views of the present Canadian condition.
A random who’s who of what’s-his-names, never-heard-of-’ems and other unforgettable Canadians 1415

A random who’s who of what’s-his-names, never-heard-of-’ems and other unforgettable Canadians

WHAT BUGS ME about 1967 as Canada's Centennial year is that I can't think about it without thinking about Canadian history — and Old Lady Mackenzie. She was my grade-five history teacher—an angular spinster, exactly 109 years old, with stringy grey-black hair, resonant vocal cords, and eyes in the back of her head.
'We are an echo of Washington' 2425

'We are an echo of Washington'

WHEN I FINISHED my three years at Oxford in 1935, I was invited by Sir Stafford Cripps to remain in England, enter his law chambers and “stand” as a Labor candidate. It was a flattering and tempting invitation. Politics had been my major interest since I entered McGill University in 1927.
MAILBAG 5455

MAILBAG

THANKS TO Irving Layton for his fair report on West Germany, 1966 (Two Views Of Germany). Since I've been in Canada I've met with rather distorted views and much prejudice concerning Germany and the German people, based, to a great extent, on mere lack of information.
If you can't beat the horses, why 3233

If you can't beat the horses, why

As LONG AS THERE ARE rich men there will be racehorses. As Thorstein Veblen pointed out, conspicuous consumers will always covet these animals because they are exceedingly expensive and absolutely useless. And as long as there are horses there will be horse players — mothers, stepfathers, Stork Diaper Service delivery men, teeny boppers, aunties in funny hats, the whole bunch — out at the track throwing away their money.
How to sell a little country BIG! 3031

How to sell a little country BIG!

"WHAT I’M WAITING FOR,” says the world's greatest stage designer, “is the moment when everything’s set up in Montreal. We've worked for two years on this display, and now at last I press the button, and—nothing happens!” This is Josef Svoboda talking: stage designer, socialist millionaire, world citizen, nonstop genius, one of the great men of Czechoslovakia, and just now he’s making a mild little joke about his country’s $10 million pavilion at Expo 67. Svoboda is a little groggy.
CHECKLISTINGS 6869

CHECKLISTINGS

James S. Rand says his Run For The Trees (General Publishing $6.95) is an adventure story for adults, and that it isn't dirty. He’s right. It isn’t dirty. It’s filthy. Set in South Africa, its central characters are a South African landowner and a British professional hunter, who meets the South African hunter by saving his life.
December 171966 February 11967