July 1, 1976

With Prime Minister Ian Smith 45
Interview

With Prime Minister Ian Smith

The image of Ian Smith, Prime Minister of Rhodesia, is that of a stern racist determined to hold onto power, not only in the face of guerrilla war and economic sanctions but Henry Kissinger's declared support for black nationalism. One imagines in Rhodesia a fearful white population, an uneasy Salisbury—the capital city—and a tense, worried Smith.
Baby-boom babies, off on a spree 4849
Lifestyles

Baby-boom babies, off on a spree

The invitation, trendily printed in white on an ordinary paper bag, arrived in a tasteful brown box. “Bag it, or box it,” it read, “Hazelton Lanes is a great address.” The occasion was a coming-out party in June for 57 luxury condominiums and 55 pricy boutiques in Toronto’s Yorkville district, whose destiny, the invitation might have added, is to be the right address.
Walker vs. Bayi: The race of the century 2829

Walker vs. Bayi: The race of the century

It will be eleven o’clock in the morning in Auckland, midnight in Dar es Salaam— and five in the afternoon in Montreal— when New Zealand’s John Walker and Tanzania’s Filbert Bayi line up for the start of the men’s 1,500-metre final. If a single 3 1/2-minute race may be fairly said to capture the spirit of the Olympic Games, it is this event, already being billed as the race of the century.
A nation divided against itself 1819
Canada

A nation divided against itself

In retrospect, it was fitting that elaborate Parliament Hill ceremonies to mark 109 years of nationhood were canceled July 1 for reasons of economy. It seemed scarcely the occasion for a birthday party. Not for many years had the Frenchand Englishspeaking communities been so bitterly divided—and the division went to the heart of Pierre Trudeau’s cabinet.
Ender & Company: East Germany’s wonders of the water 3233

Ender & Company: East Germany’s wonders of the water

From time to time, the Olympics have seen the emergence of nations uniquely skilled in specific events—Bulgarian weight lifters, Kenyan runners, Hungarian fencers. To that list the Montreal games will almost certainly add the East German women’s swimming team—the finest collective and individual example of athletic brilliance to be found anywhere.
Other favorites, other events 4041

Other favorites, other events

Archery: The dullest Olympic sport, archery was resurrected for the 1972 Games after a 52-year hibernation; no one has yet figured out why. Competitors shoot 288 arrows at targets over distances ranging from 30 to 90 metres. Canada’s prospects: excellent.
The Ugly Canadian, or: turnabout isn’t always fair play 5455
Environment

The Ugly Canadian, or: turnabout isn’t always fair play

The dragline wrenches at the ground, its massive scoop tearing out 100 tons of soil at a bite, once every 55 seconds. The land around looks like an old meteor crater; great piles of grey muck lie pocked with pools of brackish water and surrounded by a barren plain of drying mud.
Ladies and gentlemen, the next Prime Minister of Canada-or a good facsimile 6465

Ladies and gentlemen, the next Prime Minister of Canada-or a good facsimile

The problem is that the Insatiable Maw chews up leaders. The Insatiable Maw, that voracious beast with iron teeth, electrodes for eyes and typewriter keys for innards, has to be fed. Down the gullet of public boredom they go: cabinet ministers who’ve been too long in the waiting room, business tycoons overcooked on the spit over the rubber chicken—and especially leaders.
Ten good ways to while away a dog day afternoon 6061
Books

Ten good ways to while away a dog day afternoon

What books to serve on salad days? John Updike claims to have countered muggy Manhattan with 4,000 pages of Proust and a soupçon of Kierkegaard. Lesser mortals might sympathize with the French poet Francis Jammes: “I have spent the summer reading poems and plays by talented gentlemen from Paris.
Beneath all the pious talk of ‘keeping the airways safe’ is a simple case of racism 1415

Beneath all the pious talk of ‘keeping the airways safe’ is a simple case of racism

“It’s the airplane, I think,” said Professor Northrop Frye on CBC-TV, “that has made one crucial difference to the Canadian consciousness. The airplane supplied a perspective that began to pull the country together.” Frye may be asking himself these days if it is not the airplane that is tearing the country apart.
June 281976 August 11976