October 2, 1978

Cover Story

Law and order on the march

Archaeology

Philip of Macedon slept here (maybe)

Law and order on the march 2627
Cover Story

Law and order on the march

They buried Harry Snedden with honor last week. They placed his cap upon a Canadian flag, which lay across his coffin, and from the crowded pews of St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church in suburban Toronto they sang him to rest, privately measuring the meaning of his death.
Letters 16h17

Letters

Your interview with Lloyd Dennis (Sept. 4) was not only timely, but interesting and thought-provoking. The Hall-Dennis Report probably did more to blow fresh air into a stuffy education system than any other single publication in Canada.
Philip of Macedon slept here (maybe) 52d53
Archaeology

Philip of Macedon slept here (maybe)

The ancient Greeks regarded their northern cousins, the Macedonians, as little better than semi-civilized barbarians, but the early Macedonian kings produced a line of rulers that were to lead their people to mastery of the known world.
It’s enough to make you sick—or dead 5051
Environment

It’s enough to make you sick—or dead

For the residents of St. Pierre Jolys, a community of 1,000 located 40 kilometres south of Winnipeg, the tornado which ripped through southern Manitoba last June was the last straw, memorable not for what it hit, but for what it narrowly missed.
A rich man’s spiritual 4647
Sports

A rich man’s spiritual

Don Green stood in the rain on the U.S. Coast Guard wharf at Harbor Beach, Michigan, watching as his crew struggled with the tangled shrouds and twisted metal that remained of Evergreen’s 56-foot, $18,000 mast, betrayed by an $11 below-decks fitting called a chainplate.
Namibia: more than a sacred trust profaned 3233
World News

Namibia: more than a sacred trust profaned

When the League of Nations entrusted the windswept, sparsely populated territory of Namibia, then known as South-West Africa, to the government of neighboring South Africa shortly after the First World War, it emphasized that a solemn responsibility—a sacred trust of civilization—went with the mandate.
Rock’s queen at 32 45
Frontlines

Rock’s queen at 32

Linda Ronstadt spent a good portion of her childhood stretched out on the cool cement floor of her family’s house in Tucson, Arizona, a small radio grafted to her ear. All she ever wanted to do was sound like the singers on the radio and in 1964, at the age of 18, she took off for Hollywood with $30 in her pocket.
Bad news for good books: Mrs. Grundy rides again 52b52c
Education

Bad news for good books: Mrs. Grundy rides again

Playwright, poet and teacher Henry Beissel has seen it all before. Last month’s Huron County school board banning of Margaret Laurence’s The Diviners; the recent campaign by eight federal MPs to arouse taxpayer support for cutting West Coast poet Bill Bissett off Canada Council grants for writing “pornography”; the petitions currently circulating the Maritimes to rout modern novels out of the classroom—all these symptoms sound too familiar to Beissel, a veteran of censorship battles since the 1963 relaxation of the Alberta Censors Act he won to allow Tom Jones into provincial movie theatres.
A clear case of déjà vu 3435
World News

A clear case of déjà vu

The parallel with the sequel to Egyptian President Anwar Sadat’s November, 1977, visit to Jerusalem was uncannily close. On the one hand there was the lonely figure of Sadat plodding down the road to peace ahead of his 40 million fellow countrymen.
So you would become a Mario Puzo, eh? First listen to this cautionary tale 5859
Column

So you would become a Mario Puzo, eh? First listen to this cautionary tale

As there’s been so much publicity recently about prodigious paperback advances for undeserving writers—$1 million here, $2 million there—I think it might be helpful to get the facts straight. To begin with, such advances against royalties are rare, exceedingly rare, and the bonanza isn’t quite what it appears to be.
September 251978 October 91978