January 29, 1979

THE SEVENTIES A witch’s brew of a decade 3637
Business

THE SEVENTIES A witch’s brew of a decade

perhaps the event that best brackets the decade suddenly end ing-one claim we can hold onto as proof that the Seventies weren’t just the Fifties in a leisure suit—was the return, late last year, of Jacques and Louise Cossette-Trudel from their exile in France.
Around the world in 80 delays 1819
Canadian News

Around the world in 80 delays

Joe Clark affected a casual air at the start of his meeting last week with Shimon Peres, his opposite number in Jerusalem. But as the Israeli opposition leader tossed off biblical allusions and seasoned readings on the Middle East, Clark slouched visibly in his chair.
The citizens who died for atom and country 4445
Environment

The citizens who died for atom and country

As the United States began testing its nuclear weapons in the Nevada desert 28 years ago, the few scattered families who lived close by believed they were privileged. They would get up in the dark to see the mammoth blasts turn dawn into day. In the red cliff and desert canyon country of southwest Utah the farmers gathered to stare in wonder at the mushroom clouds that followed the first white flash.
Easing the trials of a legal career 4647
Lifestyles

Easing the trials of a legal career

What? Perry Mason tense? Never! Only those unfortunate enough to be cross-examined by television’s top lawyer fall victim to sweaty palms and shaking hands. But, in real life, lawyers as well as witnesses regularly suffer the effects of the 20th century’s most pervasive malady—stress.
The word’s the thing to catch the crowd 5455
Theatre

The word’s the thing to catch the crowd

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, perched side by side on bony chairs in the old Rideau Winter Club, are struggling to maintain their dignity. Hamlet is leaning over them, improvising under orders. From outside the bare rehearsal hall infiltrate noises of traffic snarled in an Ottawa winter.
Letters 1415
Letters

Letters

The article, Sowing the Seeds of Suspicion (Dec. 18), alarms and perturbs me greatly. We operate a small privately owned seed business and have been involved in the industry since 1950. We know from experience and from historical records just what improved varieties of plant life have done to help feed the masses.
More guns-and hold the butter 2425
World News

More guns-and hold the butter

The official description of it was “lean and austere,” but that was a modest understatement compared with some of the things Americans—particularly the ones on whom he will most depend for re-election in 1980—were saying this week about President Jimmy Carter’s new budget.
Bayonets beware—Joe ‘Cecil Trueheart’ Clark is loose among the landed gentry 5657
Column

Bayonets beware—Joe ‘Cecil Trueheart’ Clark is loose among the landed gentry

The problem is that Joe Clark really is a nice guy. He is kind, he is considerate. He would never do anything intentionally rude. He is, in a way, a sort of sociological freak, a mutation from the 1930s in the way he acts. Watching him carefully at close range over an extended period of days, one gets the impression of Cecil Trueheart, the second lead in a Noël Coward play set in the landed gentry belt of Kent.
Catching up with Burroughs 45
Frontlines

Catching up with Burroughs

The setting is Toronto. The setting is New York City. Onstage a lean grey man in a grey-brown synthetic suit is sitting at a small wooden desk in a hard pool of light, reading from books, magazines and pages of manuscript. As he reads, he shuffles through them—apparently impatient with their order.
This land is your land 4849
Media

This land is your land

Two years ago, when the movie, Network, was packing them in at the cinemas, the Canadian Association for Adult Education had an idea. Why not stage, in the form of network television specials, a grassroots debate on Canada’s future and other issues of the day? “Right from the start we wanted CBC to do it,” says CAAE’s executive director, Ian Morrison.
January 221979 February 51979