May 7, 1979

THE UNDECIDED: Where will they go ? 2223
ELECTION'79

THE UNDECIDED: Where will they go ?

It is a time of antipathy against Pierre Trudeau and ambivalence about Joe Clark. It is a season when Ed Broadbent, a socialist in Pierre Cardin threads, mainstreets outside the Toronto Stock Exchange; when Créditiste leader Fabien Roy, political scion of Réal Caouette’s fierce federalism, hitches his star to the Parti Québécois machine.
The selling of the candidates 44h45
ELECTION '79

The selling of the candidates

Within a dozen cramped blocks in downtown Toronto there are to be found three versions of the future. The singular point they have in common is that all are scheduled to begin this coming May 22, election day. The first version belongs to Jerry Grafstem, a bright lawyer who looks like a reconditioned Woody Allen, larger and hairier, a man who has recently spent so many 18-hour days rifling through telephone messages that he has become convinced he “can hear something moving out there.”
Bill Neville: Joe Clark’s weatherman 1415
Frontlines

Bill Neville: Joe Clark’s weatherman

It was as good a place for a showdown as any. William Neville, Joe Clark’s chief of staff and the non-elected official most likely to succeed should the Tories ride to glory May 22, was in the john. His wife of 20 years, Marilyn, was in a quandary.
Who wil have ‘the last chance’? 3031
World

Who wil have ‘the last chance’?

From the air they look like four fragile candles flickering in the middle of the threatening North Sea. But as the small jet swoops over the Forties—the rich oil field halfway between Scotland and Norway—the candles suddenly turn into fierce 100-foot gas flares, the candlesticks into 60,000-ton platforms grasping the seabed 420 feet below.
East side, west side, all around the town 4040a
Sports

East side, west side, all around the town

The marquees dot the night along Broadway, off Broadway, and off-off Broadway. First-run movies vie for attention with the nightwalkers in Times Square. The Metropolitan Opera, Carnegie Hall and Radio City Music Hall trumpet ads on radio and billboards and the Yankees are fighting again.
What a little Moonbeam can do 5455
Publishing

What a little Moonbeam can do

John Flood lives in Moonbeam, 200 miles south of James Bay, and the wolves sometimes howl at his door. He’s not a trapper or a miner, though; John Flood is a publisher. He owns and runs the Penumbra Press which in February published two books of poetry and Twelve Northern Drawings, a limited edition of Algonquin sketches by Carl Schaefer—a friend and near contemporary of the Group of Seven.
Letters 2020a
Letters

Letters

The last words Your readers across the country must have been bewildered by Allan Fotheringham’s column of persiflage directed at Jerry Goodis in The Flack Who Brought You Hush Puppies (April 16). They must have wondered why, at this moment in our history, he would want to devote a whole column to picking on a man—how he combs his hair, his physical stature, ability to put ideas together—who simply runs an advertising company in Toronto.
Peoplei 3839

Peoplei

In a modern China, where things go better with Coke, could Bugs Bunny be far behind? Or was that Brer Rabbit hopping along the Great Wall? Or was it Congresswoman Patricia Schroeder of Denver, Colorado? Back in Washington D.C. last week from a congressional junket to China, she indignantly denied a report by The Associated Press that she had frolicked on the wall while dressed head-to-toe in a white rabbit costume with large ears and cottontail.
A marriage cult grows in the church 45
Frontlines

A marriage cult grows in the church

In the drab basement of Notre Dame de Lourdes Church in Cyrville, outside Ottawa, an “information session” is under way to acquaint 25 attentive couples with the marital bliss that awaits them through Marriage Encounter. The LaRivières introduce themselves: “My name is Nicolas and this is my wife Jeanette.
Quebec: the power lies along the great divide 2627
Canada

Quebec: the power lies along the great divide

It happened halfway through the campaign, at the end of an old-time, outdoor rally behind the stone church at St.-Raymond de Portneuf. As the crowd dispersed like the rays of spring sunshine glinting from the silver steeple, the Liberal party’s chief Quebec organizer and Canada’s portly public works minister, André Ouellet, lunged for the microphone to announce to the dumbfounded villagers: “A Chinaman, a Japanese and Joe Clark are dead.
April 301979 May 141979