April 14, 1980

Quebec means business 3031

Quebec means business

A new-boy network of entrepreneurs is shattering the old myths
The happy rebirth of an intricate art 5657
Art

The happy rebirth of an intricate art

The huge golden beak curves down over the saucer of a clamshell. Frozen along the edges of the shell and wedged inside it are the carved buttocks and blank faces of small humans coaxed from the comfort of their clam birthplace by the unctious wheedling of Raven: The Trickster.
Art as energy 1213
Profile

Art as energy

Had Toronto been the Paris of the 1920s, artist Charles Pachter was saying as he sat in his living room besieged by morning sunlight and new resolve, his friends in the city’s artistic community would probably have stormed the offices of the art critics and poured wine over their heads, or poked a few noses.
Erasing stigma with eloquence 5051
Justice

Erasing stigma with eloquence

The 24-year-old woman with the square grey glasses and straight brown hair was infuriated. The membership meeting in North Vancouver had been called to discuss changing the name of the North Shore Association for the Mentally Retarded.
Letters 2222a

Letters

Something of value Since our institute has some claim to being a Canadian pioneer in the field of ethics studies (Life and Death Ethics, March 17) and because our approach is somewhat innovative, your readers may be interested in learning about it. We see the current crisis as double-edged.
A cooling firebrand singes the referendum 67
Q&A

A cooling firebrand singes the referendum

Maclean’s: A decade ago, you were saying the Parti Québécois was the legitimate heir to the Quebec independence movement of the 1960s, and telling those interested in “changing the world” that that was where they belonged. What has happened to the PQ—or to your concept of independence—since then to change your mind?
People 4445

People

Acid guru Timothy Leary no longer believes that the future lies in LSD. Instead, he’s looking forward to “pharmaceutical advances” in the ’80s that will abolish human illness. “The biggest gas of all would be to immunize people against stupidity,” says 60-year-old Leary, who believes the humanitarian drug boom will tie in nicely with his Space Migration Intelligence Increase and Life Extension (SMILE) program.
Flipper madness 46d47
Behavior

Flipper madness

Is there anything more disheartening than watching a Lazarus ball bleed? From the uninitiated, on a good day, that question might elicit a perplexed “Huh?”, but the ever-increasing crowd familiar with the parlance of pinball would understand that it’s tantamount to tragedy.
The churlish factor 22d23
Canada

The churlish factor

Six months ago, behind closed doors, a prominent federal MP from Quebec—now a cabinet minister-shocked his caucus colleagues by suggesting they all vote “yes” in the Quebec referendum, thereby neutralizing the Parti Québécois’ glamorous and apparently successful campaign.
Tall in the saddle again 4041
U.S.A.

Tall in the saddle again

Relaxing in his spacious ranch-style home overlooking the Pacific in Los Angeles after the double triumph of the Wisconsin and Kansas primaries last week, Ronald Reagan was “happy as a clam.” “I’m still singing the same old song,” explained the 69-year-old Republican front-runner.
April 71980 April 211980