July 14, 1980

COVER STORY

COAL'S BIG COMEBACK

Profile

Assayer of the silver screen

A reprieve for Cape Breton

COAL'S BIG COMEBACK 16b17
COVER STORY

COAL'S BIG COMEBACK

Thomas Hopkins The twin villages of Michel and Natal used to be coal-mining towns. In the 1940s and ’50s they looked like it. Dark billows of coal dust and ash rose over the rickety wooden houses on land owned by Crows Nest Industries. Miners’ wives gingerly hung their washing upwind as the mine trucks ground through town, adding their loads to the black mine-tailings lining southeastern B.C.’s narrow Michel Valley.
Assayer of the silver screen 89
Profile

Assayer of the silver screen

If Bette Davis wrote movie criticisms she’d be Pauline Kael. In her columns for The New Yorker since 1968, Kael’s writing on the movies has had the bracing effrontery of a puff of cigarette smoke blown out of the mouth Davis-style. In a single withering line she can dismantle a movie: “Charming young girls setting their belligerent jaws and singing about their ovules”—One Sings, The Other Doesn’t.
A reprieve for Cape Breton 2021

A reprieve for Cape Breton

On a clear Cape Breton day, a coal miner emerging from Glace Bay’s No. 26 colliery can pucker his eyes and see the island’s past, present and future. On the slope above him, white crosses leaning toward the sea, is the cemetery. Glowering above that is the hospital, linked to the pulmonary unit that is a part of any mining centre.
Back in the U.S.S.A. 5253
Books

Back in the U.S.S.A.

THE OAK AND THE CALF by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn THE MORTAL DANGER by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
Letters 1415

Letters

I am glad that someone as articulate and obviously emulatable as John Lydon, or as he is known to his fans— Johnny Rotten—figures so prominently in your magazine. ('I Really Don't Know What to Say', Q & A, June 2). It is good that a magazine of your circulation familiarizes its readers with this man who seems to have as his fans a significant portion of our young people.
People 3839

People

When she was 19 and broke, Alberta Watson sauntered into a CBC audition hoping to land a bit part. She walked away, flabbergasted, with the lead role. Now completing work on her sixth movie job, Watson’s roles are getting better and her name’s getting around in the movie industry.
Ten years later, the bad news gets worse 4647
Health

Ten years later, the bad news gets worse

It’s nearly 10 years since millions of North American women who took the synthetic estrogen DES got the first bad news: the drug they had obediently swallowed during pregnancy—on their doctors’ advice—could have devastating effects on their daughters.
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Recreation

Have daring will travel

Victoria GP Alan Clews and his companions took plenty of city food on their summer vacation, but most of it went untouched. Instead they dove for abalone and mussels and collected ferns from dripping-rain forest campsites on B.C.’s Queen Charlotte Islands.
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Agriculture

Leading a horse to slaughter and profit

To most Canadians the very idea of eating horsemeat is repulsive. Because few people have any contact with the animal once known as man’s best friend, they persist in seeing the horse in a romantic light—a Black Stallion or Flicka running free with nostrils flared and tail flying.
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Canada

Stewart’s burning bridge party

When the bridge burned down in Stewart, B.C., last week, the 2,000 residents should have been slightly more upset. After all, the secluded mining community perches on the mountainous northwestern verge of the province—1,400 km from Vancouver and little more than three km from the Alaskan Panhandle border—and the bridge had connected the town to the only road link with the rest of B.C.
July 71980 July 211980