July 21, 1980

U.S.A.

Can Reagan run America?

This Canada

Inch by inch by inch

Environment

Drilling ahead with no slick solutions

Can Reagan run America? 1617
U.S.A.

Can Reagan run America?

The star of Stallion Road and many another B-grade horse opera never did win an Oscar nomination. But this Wednesday, barring an unscripted and unthinkable unhappy ending, as conservative America roars its approval, Ronald Wilson Reagan, exactor, ex-liberal and ex-governor of California, will be nominated for the greatest role of his 69 years.

Inch by inch by inch 89
This Canada

Inch by inch by inch

"No place left we haven’t been,” warns Vern Doucette. For 28 years Doucette has crossed the country as a field officer with the Geodetic Survey of Canada. When he started out in 1952, a 30-year-old decorated war hero with itchy feet and blue eyes glazed from focusing on far horizons, it really was still possible to be something of an explorer; to answer that ancient human urge to be the first, to know that his encounter with the wilderness was unique.
Drilling ahead with no slick solutions 4243
Environment

Drilling ahead with no slick solutions

From his house in St. John’s, Alastair Allan can watch, even as he talks on the telephone, the Atlantic Ocean roll in and out in all its full-blown indifference, an erratic roar and tumble for novice observers of froth, swell and tide, a clockwork grey to a marine scientist such as Allan.
People 3839

People

Audiences loved it when Burt Reynolds and a team of acting convicts challenged prison guards to work out their hostilities on the football field in the 1974 film The Longest Yard. Now Sylvester Stallone is playing out a similar aggression-relief theme in the film Escape to Victory, but instead of crushing pigskin against American penal turf he’s kicking a soccer ball across a fictitious Second World War prisoner-of-war camp in Budapest.
The case of the woman who was too rich to die 3233
Canada

The case of the woman who was too rich to die

In the old days, before the Beaches became one of Toronto’s distinctive neighborhoods, the well-to-do who lived and worked in the city built their cottages to the east, close to Lake Ontario. It was a summer place. Later, a boardwalk was built, a canoe club followed, and on a warm afternoon the elders could be seen playing a game of bowls on a tailored green.
Letters 1415

Letters

Roy MacGregor continues to impress me as one of the most unaffected, unpretentious journalists writing in Canada today. I am referring to his excellent profile on Mordecai Richler (Probing the Jewish Soul, Cover, June 9). Although not a fan of Richler’s, I could not help but feel his frustrations, his despair and his loneliness as so eloquently revealed by MacGregor.
Of little green men and mutilated cows 4647
Behavior

Of little green men and mutilated cows

Frank Spath, an Oyen, Alta., farmer looking after 400 or 500 head of cattle, found a dead cow on one of his grazing leases in May. Coyotes hadn’t touched the carcass, Spath reported, but there were clean cuts around the animal’s jaw. He deduced that death had been caused by a shoulder hemorrhage, but he couldn’t figure out what caused the wound.
Devotees of the kiss of ink on paper 4849
Books

Devotees of the kiss of ink on paper

When the last member of the Group of Seven is 82 years old and publishes a book of prints, the demand is predictably high. But even if you are devoted enough to venture $2,700, you will not be able to buy a copy of A. J. Casson/A Tribute when it is published this month.
But it can happen here 67
Podium

But it can happen here

As one who cherishes his Canadian roots, I have always considered a world without Canada unthinkable. But today the unthinkable must be regarded as a real possibility, for the future of Canada cannot be taken for granted. History demonstrates that nations are not the most durable of human institutions.
Sourpusses and soreheads: death in the Sweet Science 4041
Sports Column

Sourpusses and soreheads: death in the Sweet Science

In a place where a great many people wear their left eye, a fighter named Scott LeDoux was wearing steak tartare. For seven rounds he had fought a losing game with it against half of the world’s current supply of heavyweight champions, Larry Holmes.
July 141980 July 281980