August 4, 1980

HERE COME THE TOURISTS 3435

HERE COME THE TOURISTS

In the rich, rinsed light of a late June evening, the soul of Canada has come to rest in the St. Lawrence village of Morrisburg. It is Old Home Week, a celebration of past roots and present virtues. Decent men from the Lions Club organize parking for the returning natives.
People 2829

People

She prefers not to be called a feminist and likes to keep her political views to herself, but English singer/song-writer Joan Armatradlng has observed that the U.S. presidential election is shaping up to be “a bloomin’ show.” Armatrading’s latest album, Me Myself I, gives some clues to her lyrics, which tend to be insular.
The right to rediscover roots 4243
Justice

The right to rediscover roots

When deepsea diver Jim Kelly pursues his hazardous job in the North Sea and Arctic oilfields, his life depends on the air line extending from the mother ship. But for most of the past nine months, Kelly has been looking for another kind of life-support system—an awareness of who his natural parents are.
The ugly ally of the West 2021
World

The ugly ally of the West

In one verse of the rarely sung Turkish national anthem, there is a reference to “the monster called Europe.” Today, in all Europe, to say nothing of the rest of the world, there are few countries that could match Turkey’s record for civil violence and political murder.
African tragedy 89
Dateline

African tragedy

Several times a week Sister Rosetta and students from the remote mission school at Kaabong in arid northeastern Uganda perform a gruesome task. They spread out in nearby fields and search the bush for the bloated bodies of children and adults who have died of starvation.
An insider’s snip at censorship 67
Q&A

An insider’s snip at censorship

Maclean’s: You've had your troubles with censorship. Last Tango in Paris was banned completely in your own country and Luna had its problems too, notably in Ontario. How do you feel about being censored? Bertolucci: It depends which kind of censorship we’re talking about.
The weeklies grow stronger 4041
Press

The weeklies grow stronger

As debate raged in the New Brunswick legislature in June over cost and work habits at the Point Lepreau nuclear power plant (Maclean's, July 7,1980), Liberal allegations of government malfeasance were buttressed by revelations from an unexpected source: The St. Croix Courier.
As far as eyes can see 1617
Canada

As far as eyes can see

Toward the year 1000, western Europe was filled with foreboding. People noted shooting stars, failed crops and the birth of deformed calves with dread: The Millenium is at hand! Repent and he saved! That such mille -narian anxiety is back was amply demonstrated at last week’s First Global Conference on the Future as the world slouched on to 2000 AD.
As if two languages weren’t enough 67
Podium

As if two languages weren’t enough

The negotiations for a new constitution seem headed for a grinding halt in the fall. Not only are the talks bedevilled by an enormous agenda and an absurdly short time frame; they don’t share a common language of disclosure. I suspect that the three leading protagonists, Pierre Trudeau, Peter Lougheed and René Lévesque , are talking past each other because they are speaking three different languages, that is, using the same words to mean quite different things.
Poker at the end of a gun 45
Backstage

Poker at the end of a gun

Perhaps it was an omen for the Lougheed government. Media experience had established it; the LalondeLeitch round of preliminary confrontations confirmed it. Now Peter Lougheed’s own government was discovering it—that Alberta and its leaders were seen as tough and unyielding: the gunfighters of Canadian politics.
July 281980 August 111980