September 8, 1980

FOOTBALL DYNASTY ON THE MARCH 3435

FOOTBALL DYNASTY ON THE MARCH

Edmonton Eskimo kicker Dave Cutler sits on the back porch of his farm house 35 km from the city limits and, more important, 40 km from Commonwealth Stadium. Three-and-ahalf hours earlier, 42,778 fans had cheered as the scoreboard flashed: “Dave ties pro football field goal record—335.”
Anatomy of a Soviet defection 1617
Q & A: Oleg Shmelyoff

Anatomy of a Soviet defection

On June 5 in Gander, Nfld., a young Soviet engineer whose electronics and computer specialties involved him in highly secret work with satellites, stepped off an Aeroflot flight bound for Cuba, escaped the notice of Soviet police monitoring the stopover and asked the first likely official he found to call the police.
The day the news caught fire 20f21
Canada

The day the news caught fire

It’s already going down in the history of the newspaper business as Black Wednesday, but it was more than that—it was the day when all the rumors finally came true. Within just 11 hours last week, a fabulous epoch in Canadian journalism came to an end— along with at least two large daily papers, The Winnipeg Tribune and the Ottawa Journal, and the jobs of 800 employees.
People 3839
People

People

"We needed to have someone who people would be willing to pay $25 to see,” explained a spokeswoman for Women in Crisis, a hotline and emergency-shelter organization for battered women in Guelph, Ont. The $25-person turns out to be Toronto Maple Leafs president and renowned sexist Harold Ballard.
Closing in for the kill? 2425
New Brunswick

Closing in for the kill?

After a decade of faltering Liberal rule, Richard Bennett Hatfield came to power in 1970 as the New Brunswick Tories’ fair-haired boy. Earnestness was his pitch, credibility his biggest asset. “I give you my word, and my word is good,” he declared.
Reaping a personal harvest 5253
Lifestyles

Reaping a personal harvest

There’s a soft old irresistible ring to it, like goin’fishin’.Goin’pickin’ ... discovering the laconic harvest innocence and rural scents that run scarce in the local supermarket. Every year, more Canadian city-dwellers, thousands more, are going out to the fields, as much for the delectable outing as for the bargain, gathering their own blueberries, peaches, apples, strawberries, sweet cherries, corn, cucumbers, walnuts.
No room at the lodge-yet 1011
This Canada

No room at the lodge-yet

A stunning contrast awaits the stranger stepping down from the train at the CN station at Minaki, a sleepy town 50 km northwest of Kenora, Ont.: ahead stretches a breathtaking vista of lakes and forest, behind droops what must be one of the ugliest, most unkempt stations wherever rails run.
The creeping shame of the love virus T445
Health

The creeping shame of the love virus

When infectious diseases specialist Dr. Stephen Sacks opens his new clinic this week at the University of British Columbia, he will have no problem finding patients. For Sacks is opening Canada’s first clinic specifically for victims of herpes simplex type 2, a sexually transmitted genital disease which is rapidly gaining on gonorrhea as the most widespread venereal disease in North America.
Speak to me only with thine art 89
Podium

Speak to me only with thine art

A major exhibit of new Canadian art ends this week at the National Gallery in Ottawa. Pluralities 1980—four expensive floors of angle iron, plywood runways, creeping Pintos and reverently framed “working drawings”—occasioned cultural breastbeating and disparaging comment alike.
Two deaths in the family 4041
Business

Two deaths in the family

When Al Capone and Bugs Moran promised not to trespass on each other’s bootlegging territory, it was the last straw. Yet last week when Canada’s two largest newspaper chains reached a similar accord, the outcry, though loud, was impotent.
September 11980 September 151980