May 7, 1984

The ‘Vengeance’ Affair 3233
COVER

The ‘Vengeance’ Affair

The book’s origins are bizarre. Even the author does not know the exact role that his principal source played. And the source, the mysterious figure known only as “Avner,” admits that no one can verify the book’s central claims. But its contents are compelling, and the issue it addresses—terrorism— is of mounting global concern. As a result, Vengeance:
LETTERS 45
LETTERS

LETTERS

In her new book Sex and Destiny Germaine Greer has proposed the remedy of motherhood to cure the disease of trivialized sex—which she herself had at least a hand in creating (Life with less sex, Cover, April 16). While her delayed confession of error is commendable, her remedial proposal is regrettable.
Confessions over cups of lemon tea 4445
COVER

Confessions over cups of lemon tea

It was a cold and bleak Good Friday, and the self-proclaimed assassin was watching both his weight and his back. During a bizarre five-hour interview—the first of two cautious meetings that he arranged with Maclean's—the man known only as “Avner” merely picked at his luncheon of fruit salad while he talked about killing people for Israel and living on the run.
A futurist’s gloomy vision 16d16e
Q&A: ISAAC ASIMOV

A futurist’s gloomy vision

By the time Isaac Asimov’s 300th book, appropriately titled Opus 300, reaches bookstores this fall, the prolific author will have completed at least a dozen more volumes. Since he published his first short story in 1938, Asimov, 64, who writes an average of 15 to 20 books a year, has produced works as varied as The Human Body and The Roman Empire.
The Liberal numbers game 1819
CANADA

The Liberal numbers game

Organizers for Liberal leadership candidate John Turner exuded confidence last week before a delegate selection meeting in the federal riding of Vancouver Centre. Key members of his campaign had worked to sign up more than 200 new Liberals.
The darkening war clouds 2627
WORLD

The darkening war clouds

The witness was William Casey, controversial director of the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency. Participants described his exchanges with the Senate Intelligence Committee as “spirited” and “sharp.” Behind closed doors last week the Senate panel interrogated Washington’s spymaster on the Reagan administration’s covert war against Nicaragua’s Sandinista government.
Reagan woos the giant 2829
WORLD

Reagan woos the giant

Arare 21-gun salute signalled the importance that Ronald Reagan’s hosts accorded the occasion. When the president began a fiveday tour of China last week he clearly shared that mood of high significance. In meetings with government officials Reagan carefully downplayed deeply rooted Sino-American disputes and his own suspicions of the Chinese.
Fonda and the unforgiving Right 16l17
AN AMERICAN VIEW

Fonda and the unforgiving Right

In the old days Jane Fonda would go on television to bear witness against the Vietnam War, and around the United States peace freaks would bury their heads. Uh-oh, Janie again! Heart in the right place, Fonda seemed disoriented when it came to matters of the mind.
A big merger on Bay Street 4849
BUSINESS/ECONOMY

A big merger on Bay Street

Anthony Fell and Ward Pitfield were beaming when they faced an array of reporters and photographers last week to announce the biggest merger in Bay Street’s history. On June 1, they declared, Dominion Securities Ames Ltd., which Fell has headed since 1978, and Pitfield Mackay Ross Ltd., which Pitfield has chaired for the past 17 years, will combine to form Canada’s largest investment firm.
The pre-Olympic trials 1213
DATELINE: LOS ANGELES

The pre-Olympic trials

Bathed in garish fluorescent light, a stand in the newly renovated Los Angeles airport displays more than 100 different brands of 1984 Olympic souvenirs. There are mugs and sweatshirts, guidebooks and key chains, paperweights and ball-point pens.
Sound device for the deaf 6869
MEDICINE

Sound device for the deaf

For thousands of deaf people the only hope of escaping a world of total silence is the rapidly developing technology of an electrical device that bears no resemblance to a hearing aid. The “cochlear implant,” or artificial ear—conceived in the early 1960s but still largely experimental—is intended to help people so profoundly deaf that they gain no benefit at all from a hearing aid.
April 301984 May 141984