July 16, 1984

COVER

Young and out of work

CANADA

Countdown to an election

BUSINESS/ECONOMY

Riding on a merger wave

Young and out of work 3435
COVER

Young and out of work

In Coquitlam, B.C.,23-year-old engineering technologist Darren Bartel invests 20 hours a week watching television or lying on the beach because the reality of 13 months of unemployment has dashed his dreams of a promising future. In Halifax 19-year-old high school dropout Phillip Downey has discovered that no employer will hire him because he lacks skilled training and on-the-job experience.
Countdown to an election 1011
CANADA

Countdown to an election

A late-summer election showdown between Prime Minister John Turner and Conservative leader Brian Mulroney seemed inevitable. All signs last week indicated that Turner, who won the Liberal party leadership on June 16, had decided to move immediately to seek a mandate of his own.
Riding on a merger wave 2627
BUSINESS/ECONOMY

Riding on a merger wave

The Dow Jones average of U.S. industrial stock prices is down 10 per cent from its early 1984 peak and rising interest rates are haunting Wall Street. But corporate merger activity in the United States has reached a pace that Kenneth Miller, the chief of mergers and acquisitions for Merrill Capital Markets, describes as “torrid.”
Hard times in the wheat belt 1617
CANADA

Hard times in the wheat belt

Prairie farmers have reaped a bumper crop of troubles in recent years, and 41-year-old John Jago has suffered virtually all of them in his struggle to keep his farm near Reston, Man. After a combination of low grain prices and high interest rates left Jago $350,000 in debt last year, the Virden Credit Union foreclosed and seized half his 1,280-acre property.
Easing the pain of income tax 8b9
COLUMN

Easing the pain of income tax

In late June The Globe and Mail carried a front-page story that said the federal department of finance was studying the idea of a “flat rate” income tax. It is an idea that members of our country’s intelligentsia have judged to be unworkable because they insist it would shift the tax burden from the rich to the poor.
Talking down ‘Star Wars’ 1819
WORLD

Talking down ‘Star Wars’

The Soviet ambassador to the United States, Anatoly Dobrynin, flew to Moscow last week for what were officially described as routine consultations. By leaving, he escaped the oppressive heat of Washington’s summer—and possibly made an important advance in East-West relations.
When familiarity breeds consent 5657
COLUMN

When familiarity breeds consent

There was a time, not long ago, when youth was allowed its own goofy uniforms and attires. If the hippies of the 1960s wanted to affect long hair and rainbow hues, the adults were properly appalled by the outrage of it all, sucking their teeth and shaking their neat heads in despair.
A champion of the unemployed 4243
COVER

A champion of the unemployed

Only 11 months after MP Jean Lapierre and Senator Jacques Hébert began quietly lining up Liberal caucus support for a new federal department of youth, Lapierre now finds himself in charge of the new portfolio that he helped to create. At 28, the slender Quebecer is also the youngest cabinet minister since Confederation—a distinction that he points to as proof that Prime Minister John Turner is committed to curing the malaise of Canada’s 531,000 unemployed young people.
The man who would be different 3031
BUSINESS WATCH

The man who would be different

Most senators have abaloneshaped jowls and expend their remaining life force in irrelevant pursuits, such as a passion for minor French cheeses. But Michael Pitfield is different. Even though his appointment was a cynical payoff by Pierre Trudeau to a friend and colleague who came as close as any public servant to embracing the former prime minister’s ideology, the onetime clerk of the Privy Council has since been using the Red Chamber as a platform for some highly relevant opinions about the nation’s political, economic and social directions.
The Great White Shark bares his teeth 3233
SPORTS

The Great White Shark bares his teeth

For more than 20 years the world’s dominant golfer has been Jack Nicklaus, the celebrated Golden Bear. Nicklaus, 44, wrested the mantle from Arnold Palmer in the early 1960s, and he has gone on to win 70 Professional Golf Association (PGA) tour events and an unprecedented 19 so-called major championships—two U.S. Amateur titles, four U.S. Opens, five Masters, five PGA championships and three British Opens.
July 91984 July 231984