January 14, 1985

Canada’s vanishing forests 3637
CANADA/COVER

Canada’s vanishing forests

For more than 40 years Bus Griffiths logged the coastal forests of British Columbia and considered himself “one of the best in the woods.” In the 1930s he cut down centuries-old Douglas fir with a crosscut saw. Those trees were almost as tall as the 300-foot Peace Tower on Parliament Hill and big enough to build several two-bedroom houses.
Undercurrents of unease 89
CANADA

Undercurrents of unease

Liberal Jean Lapierre was just learning to enjoy the heady experience of federal political office when the Canadian electorate evicted John Turner’s party from power last Sept. 4. Lapierre managed to hold on to his Shefford riding in southeast Quebec, but the Liberals’ electoral defeat cost the 28-yearold politician his portfolio as minister of youth, fitness and amateur sport after only two months in cabinet.
A courtroom tale of terror 1819
WORLD

A courtroom tale of terror

His face twitched uncontrollably and he stammered repeatedly. In fact, the defendant’s stutter was so pronounced that he testified for only eight minutes before the court adjourned. But in that brief period last week, Polish secret policeman Waldemar Chmielewski, 29, dramatically recounted his role in the brutal kidnapping and murder of Rev. Jerzy Popieluszko, 37, a Roman Catholic priest and determined defender of the outlawed trade union Solidarity.
Peckford under siege 1011
CANADA

Peckford under siege

Brian Peckford, the shrewd but erratic premier of Newfoundland, has governed “the rock” for the past five years as a champion of the little man—the outport “b’y” with a social conscience. But a series of political crises has both blackened Peckford’s populist image and seriously challenged the direction of his government.
Holy cities in Oregon hills 2a7
AN AMERICAN VIEW

Holy cities in Oregon hills

Oregon is an exquisite state, remarkably endowed with natural splendor and intelligent leadership. A visitor is tempted to describe the population as unusually civilized—decent, open, accommodating—and the quality of life rare, indeed.
BUSINESS NOTES 3031

BUSINESS NOTES

Even though experts expect Canada's overall economic growth to slow to about three per cent in 1985 after increasing by an estimated four per cent in 1984, retailers in most parts of the country may buck that trend. Last week Leonard Kubas, president of Kubas Research Consultants of Toronto, reported that retail spending by Canadians on everything from cars to clothing rose by 9.6 per cent last year to $116.5 billion and that it should rise by nine per cent in 1985 to a total of $127 billion.
The optimistic mayor of Expo 86 3031
BUSINESS WATCH

The optimistic mayor of Expo 86

Most used-car salesmen are born with silver tongues. Jimmy Pattison’s is platinum. Maybe it’s his background as a General Motors dealer in Vancouver’s East End that allows the Expo 86 chairman to sustain his optimism in the face of union troubles, threats of pullouts by exhibitors and reports of the fiscal swamp into which the New Orleans World’s Fair sank last year.
NATIONAL NOTES 1415

NATIONAL NOTES

As Steven Fonyo resumed his cross-Canada trek last week, his relations with the Canadian Cancer Society were almost as frosty as the subzero temperatures and snow flurries that greeted him near Dryden, Ont. Fonyo, the onelegged runner who is emulating the 1980 journey of cancer victim Terry Fox, chose to ignore the society’s warnings 3 against running in midwinter.
Trauma and the good-time kids 5253
COLUMN

Trauma and the good-time kids

Wot can one say about the Yuppies? Wot would anyone want to say about them? The young urban professionals, selfish successors to the Hippies, who begat the Yippies, who dissolved into the Yuppies. Jerry Rubin, who wanted to burn down universities, now is on the lucrative lecture circuit with Abby Hoffman, who wanted to burn down the world.
GLOBAL NOTES 2425

GLOBAL NOTES

He was 80 years old at the time and recovering from a stroke. But 30-year-old cabinet documents declassified last week by the British government reveal that then-prime minister Winston Churchill remained intellectually alert, brooding over American power and the dangers of nuclear war, even as his influence in the governing Conservative party began to wane.
January 71985 January 211985