April 22, 1985

The new squeeze on Japan 3031
COVER

The new squeeze on Japan

The televised address was a formidable display of a veteran politician’s ability to appeal to his nation. When Yasuhiro Nakasone, Japan’s dashing 66-year-old prime minister, appeared before a nationwide Japanese television audience last week, his domestic viewers were captivated by his informal, comfortable style.
A new promise of equality 4849
LAW

A new promise of equality

The language was unequivocal and the overall principle— equality for everyone under the law—was beyond debate among most Canadians. But the legal and social consequences of Section 15 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, which comes into effect this week, remained far from clear.
A vast array of fundamental freedoms 5253
LAW

A vast array of fundamental freedoms

The constitutional debate preoccupying Ottawa was likely far from Joseph Cook’s mind as he eased his girlfriend’s Camaro to a stop near Prince Andrew High School in Dartmouth, N.S. Indeed, when city police pushed through the crowd of teenagers who had clustered around his car, the 21-year-old had more immediate concerns.
The fall of a business giant 3839
BUSINESS/ECONOMY

The fall of a business giant

The offices once occupied by Crosbie Offshore Services Ltd., a St. John’s ship-leasing firm declared bankrupt late in January, were silent and in disarray last week. The company name had been removed from the front door. Rags and paint cans cluttered the reception area, and cabinet doors gaped open after the Royal Canadian Mounted Police had removed the company’s files.
A town at the edge of the world 67
DATELINE: ELLESMERE ISLAND

A town at the edge of the world

From the air, the village of Grise Fiord looks like an exclamation mark. It stands on a rocky ledge between the sea ice and the glacial mountains of Ellesmere Island in the Canadian High Arctic: two rows of simple wooden houses, about 30 in all, in shades of brown, ochre and beige.
A testing time on the Tory Right 1415
CANADA

A testing time on the Tory Right

Stretching back against the sofa in his lagoon-blue Parliament Hill office, Bill Domm easily acknowledges that he did not fully understand the meaning of compromise until January. The veteran antimetrie campaigner had for years led a rearguard fight to preserve imperial measurements and he was even a partner in an “imperial gallon” service station on the outskirts of Ottawa.
The new approaches to back pain 5859
HEALTH

The new approaches to back pain

Putting out the garbage or even dusting furniture—simple tasks that most people take for granted —can be agonizing for Elaine Drew. The 38-year-old Toronto housewife was in a car accident in 1968 and, although she did not sustain any major injuries, she regularly suffers severe back pains, confining her to bed for several days at a time.
The great powers play games 1819
WORLD

The great powers play games

When Mikhail Gorbachev came to power in the Soviet Union on March 11, Western analysts predicted the articulate new leader would soon use his skills to attract favorable international opinion. Last week, as he marked the end of his first month in the Kremlin, Gorbachev attempted to do just that.
Doing less can be the better way 66T5
MEDIA WATCH

Doing less can be the better way

If, within months, Communications Minister Marcel Masse’s task force on broadcasting is to get its collective mind around what should be the objective of public policy in broadcasting, the proper roles for the CBC and private broadcasters, the needs of the provinces, the public as a whole and special groups within it, including native peoples—all the while keeping in mind the government’s cultural and economic priorities—the only decent thing to do is to step aside, bow low and wish it tne best of Canadian luck.
Adjusting to seismic changes T411
COLUMN

Adjusting to seismic changes

• Despite its assets of $3 billion, only a $255-million injection from two governments and six other banks saved the Canadian Commercial Bank from failure last month. • On June 1 the new Canadian energy pricing agreement between Ottawa and the provinces will free “old” oil—that is, oil discovered before 1974—from its current pegged price of $21.70 (U.S.), and “new” oil from its price of $29 (U.S.).
April 151985 April 291985