June 17, 1985

DRUGS IN SPORTS 4041
COVER

DRUGS IN SPORTS

Behind the blood, toil, tears and sweat of the players, behind the roar of the crowd, an avalanche of illicit drugs threatens to overwhelm the integrity of both professional and amateur sport. Drug abuse by athletes has reached such alarming levels that Olympic competitors are now tested for no fewer than 90 banned substances, and all North American professional leagues have instituted drug rehabilitation programs for players seeking help.
The high and crippling cost of cocaine 4647
COVER

The high and crippling cost of cocaine

The hardy shrub erythroxylon coca grows on the eastern slopes of the Andes Mountains and produces little yellow flowers and red berries. But it was the apple-green elliptical leaves and the enchanting powder made from them that all but ruined the life of 29-year-old Lachine, Que., unemployed parks worker Michel Larivière.
Apartheid’s powerful foe 66a
Q&A

Apartheid’s powerful foe

‘The escalating abhorrence of apartheid is putting the racist South African regime in a corner.’
Playing the high-risk drug game 4445
COVER

Playing the high-risk drug game

Athletes and alcohol have long been a tradition in professional and amateur sport. “If you’re a jock, then you drink booze,” said Dr. Philip Wilson, associate director of the chemical dependence program at the Ridge-view Institute of Smyrna, Ga., a designated alcohol and drug treatment centre for the National Football League.
Hunting the ‘Angel of Death’ 2021
WORLD

Hunting the ‘Angel of Death’

At various times since 1945 investigators have claimed that he was practising medicine in Uruguay, working as a beekeeper in Paraguay or even living in Canada. Still, Nazi Germany’s most wanted war criminal, Dr. Josef Mengele, has evaded capture successfully despite extensive manhunts and large sums offered as rewards for his apprehension.
The electronic supervisor 3233
BUSINESS/ECONOMY

The electronic supervisor

In a growing number of modern offices across Canada, office workers pursue their tasks with a heightened sense of urgency. In the steno pools of major companies secretaries tap feverishly at video display terminals. At telephone company switchboard offices in Ontario and Quebec, operators process an average of 700 long-distance calls a day at about 28 seconds per call.
An overtaxed nation protests T47
COLUMN

An overtaxed nation protests

The Canadian response to a tax system that is burdensome, unfair and incomprehensible is universal: ‘avoision’
A growing budget backlash 89
CANADA

A growing budget backlash

The backlash was slow to start. But when it gathered momentum last week, encouraged by the parliamentary opposition, the increasingly angry reaction to Finance Minister Michael Wilson’s May 23 budget caught the nine-month-old Conservative government off guard.
The sacking of a genuine star 5657
COLUMN

The sacking of a genuine star

One of the surprising things a Canadian who spends a lot of time in the United States finds is that there is a lot less TV available. Canadians, thanks to cable, get all the U.S. channels that Americans do. In addition they have the best of the CBC and whatever CTV offers.
A courtroom saga of racial accusations 50T5
LAW

A courtroom saga of racial accusations

James Keegstra has not taught school for three years, but for the past two weeks the 51-year-old auto mechanic has presented his testimony at his trial in Red Deer, Alta., as an educational exercise, outlining his unorthodox view of the world with a genial frankness.
June 101985 June 241985